2006 Ballot Proposition Guide
Issued by the Arizona Secretary of State's Office

PROPOSITION 106
OFFICIAL TITLE
AN INITIATIVE MEASURE
PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA; AMENDING ARTICLE X, SECTIONS 1, 3, AND 4, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA; AMENDING ARTICLE X, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA, BY ADDING SECTIONS 1.1, 1.2, 7.1 AND 12; RELATING TO STATE LANDS.
TEXT OF PROPOSED AMENDMENT
Be it enacted by the People of the State of Arizona:
1. Purpose
A. The purpose of this proposition is to permit the state of Arizona to manage state trust land in ways that promote well-planned growth, conservation, and sound stewardship, addressing issues that were not of concern at the time of statehood.
B. In particular, this proposition:
1. Immediately protects and preserves for future generations the significant natural, cultural, and historical assets of certain trust lands by establishing a conservation reserve of approximately 694,000 acres consisting of specified educational reserve lands that will be permanently set aside for research and education purposes, specified permanent reserve lands that will be permanently set aside for conservation purposes, and specified provisional reserve lands that will be set aside for conservation purposes and made available for purchase for a period of time.
2. Promotes well-planned growth on trust lands by requiring trust lands to be planned in conjunction with the general and comprehensive plans of counties, cities, and towns pursuant to their generally applicable ordinances, and allows the disposition of trust lands designated for conservation purposes through this process without advertisement, auction, or further consideration if the trust receives adequate consideration for all of the trust lands subject to the plan, regardless of whether it receives the true value of each individual parcel that is subject to the plan.
3. Provides opportunity for enhanced economic benefit from the disposal of trust land by allowing for the establishment of a method by which the highest and best bid will be determined at auction and allowing for the transfer of title subject to participation in the future gross revenues from the sale or lease of lands.
4. Allows for efficient and beneficial dispositions of rights-of-way by authorizing the disposition of rights-of-way without auction where the trust receives the true value as determined by appraisal and authorizing the receipt of non-monetary consideration for public right-of-ways.
5. Provides funding for effective trust administration by authorizing the allocation of a percentage of trust income to fund trust-related activities.
6. Establishes a board of trustees to review and approve certain of the activities described above where increased oversight and accountability are necessary to safeguard the best interests of the trust.
2. Article X, section 1, Constitution of Arizona, is amended as follows:
Section 1. Acceptance and holding of lands by state in trust; definitions
A. All lands expressly transferred and confirmed to the state by the provisions of the Enabling Act approved June 20, 1910, including all lands granted to the state and all lands heretofore granted to the Territory of Arizona, and all lands otherwise acquired by the state, shall be by the state accepted and held in trust to be disposed of in whole or in part, only in manner as in the said Enabling Act and in this Constitution provided, and for the several objects specified in the respective granting and confirmatory provisions. The natural products and money proceeds of any of said lands shall be subject to the same trusts as the lands producing the same.
B. IN THIS ARTICLE, UNLESS THE CONTEXT OTHERWISE REQUIRES:
1. "BOARD OF TRUSTEES" MEANS THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.2 OF THIS ARTICLE.
2. "CONSERVATION" MEANS PRESERVING THE NATURAL, CULTURAL, OR HISTORICAL ASSETS OF LAND, SUCH AS OPEN SPACE, SCENIC BEAUTY, GEOLOGY, ARCHAEOLOGY, PROTECTED PLANTS, WILDLIFE, AND ECOLOGICAL VALUES.
3. "DEVELOPMENT" MEANS BUILDINGS AND OTHER IMPROVEMENTS FOR PUBLIC OR PRIVATE USE NOT IN EXISTENCE AS OF NOVEMBER 2, 2006, BUT DOES NOT INCLUDE FENCES, PATHS, TRAILS, TRAILHEADS, ROADWAYS, UTILITY LINES AND ASSOCIATED FACILITIES, CANALS, DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS, WELLS, SIGNAGE, RANGE IMPROVEMENTS, ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION FACILITIES,COMMUNICATIONS FACILITIES, RESEARCH OR MONITORING STATIONS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT OR, IN ORDER TO FACILITATE REASONABLE PUBLIC ACCESS, PICNIC, CAMPING, HUNTING, FISHING, PARKING, SECURITY, COMFORT, MAINTENANCE AND SIMILAR FACILITIES.
4. "NONMONETARY CONSIDERATION" MEANS ANY FORM OF VALUE, RECEIVED AS A RESULT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH A DISPOSITION OF LAND, THAT CAN BE DEMONSTRATED BY AN APPRAISAL.
5. "QUALIFIED PARTY" MEANS AN AGENCY OR POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THIS STATE.
3. Article X, Constitution of Arizona, is amended by adding section 1.1 as follows:
Section 1.1. Conservation reserve; disposition of lands in conservation reserve.
A. A CONSERVATION RESERVE OF APPROXIMATELY 694,000 ACRES IS ESTABLISHED CONSISTING OF THOSE EDUCATIONAL RESERVE LANDS, PERMANENT RESERVE LANDS, AND PROVISIONAL RESERVE LANDS THAT ARE SO DESIGNATED IN SECTION 12 OF THIS ARTICLE. LANDS HELD IN THE CONSERVATION RESERVE SHALL BE RESTRICTED AGAINST DEVELOPMENT, SHALL BE MANAGED IN A MANNER CONSISTENT WITH CONSERVATION AND ARE SUBJECT TO CONVEYANCE, LEASE, REDESIGNATION OR OTHER DISPOSITION ONLY IN A MANNER CONSISTENT WITH THE PROVISIONS OF THIS SECTION, PROVIDED THAT NOTHING IN THIS SECTION SHALL PRECLUDE THE CONTINUATION OF ANY LEASE, RIGHT-OF-WAY, OR OTHER USE OF CONSERVATION RESERVE LANDS THAT WAS IN EXISTENCE AS OF THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS SECTION.
B. EDUCATIONAL RESERVE LANDS MAY BE CONVEYED TO THE ARIZONA BOARD OF REGENTS ON ITS REQUEST FOR RESEARCH AND EDUCATION. NOTWITHSTANDING SUBSECTION F OF THIS SECTION, BUILDINGS AND RELATED INFRASTRUCTURE TO SUPPORT UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS MAY BE CONSTRUCTED ON UP TO FIFTY ACRES OF EDUCATIONAL RESERVE LANDS AT LOCATIONS TO BE IDENTIFIED BY THE BOARD OF REGENTS.
C. WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, PERMANENT RESERVE LANDS MAY BE CONVEYED WITHOUT PROVISION OF FURTHER CONSIDERATION OR VALUE TO A COUNTY IF NOT OTHERWISE LEASED FOR GRAZING, TO A CITY, TOWN OR COUNTY IF THE LAND IS LOCATED WITHIN A CITY OR TOWN, OR TO A QUALIFIED PARTY IF THE LAND IS LOCATED IN THE VICINITY OF A STATE PARK OR WILDLIFE AREA AND IS NOT OTHERWISE LEASED FOR GRAZING.
D. WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, PROVISIONAL RESERVE LANDS MAY BE CONVEYED TO A QUALIFIED PARTY, AN AGENCY OF THE UNITED STATES, OR TO A NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION ORGANIZED FOR THE PURPOSES OF CONSERVATION IF THE TRUE VALUE IS PROVIDED THROUGH MONETARY OR NONMONETARY FORMS OF CONSIDERATION, ON TERMS OF UP TO TWENTY-FIVE YEARS, INCLUDING PURSUANT TO A PLAN UNDER SECTION 4, SUBSECTION C OF THIS ARTICLE. IF NO QUALIFIED PARTY ACCEPTS OR OFFERS TO ACQUIRE A PARCEL OF PROVISIONAL RESERVE LAND PRIOR TO THE EXPIRATION OF THE RESERVE PERIOD, THE PARCEL MAY BE REMOVED FROM THE CONSERVATION RESERVE AND MAY BE DISPOSED FOR OTHER PURPOSES.
E. THE RESERVE PERIOD FOR EACH PARCEL OF PROVISIONAL RESERVE LAND COMMENCES ON THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS SECTION AND CONTINUES UNTIL THE EXPIRATION DATE FOR THE PARCEL. THE EXPIRATION DATE SHALL BE AT LEAST FIVE YEARS AFTER THE LAND IS LOCATED IN THE GENERAL LAND USE PLAN AREA OF A CITY OR TOWN OR IS SUBJECT TO A PLAN PREPARED AND APPROVED PURSUANT TO SUBSECTION C OF SECTION 4 OF THIS ARTICLE.
F. UNLESS LANDS ARE ACQUIRED BY THE UNITED STATES FOR CONSERVATION PURPOSES, IT IS A PERMANENT CONDITION OF ANY CONVEYANCE OR DISPOSITION OF EDUCATIONAL RESERVE LAND, PERMANENT RESERVE LAND, AND PROVISIONAL RESERVE LAND THAT THE LAND WILL BE RESTRICTED AGAINST DEVELOPMENT, WILL BE USED IN A MANNER CONSISTENT WITH CONSERVATION, AND WILL BE SUBJECT TO REASONABLE PUBLIC ACCESS.
G. THE DESIGNATION OF A PARCEL OF LAND AS A PART OF THE CONSERVATION RESERVE SHALL NOT CREATE OR IMPLY A RESTRICTION ON THE USE OR MANAGEMENT OF OTHER LAND.
4. Article X, Constitution of Arizona, is amended by adding section 1.2 as follows:
Section 1.2. Board of trustees
A SEVEN-MEMBER BOARD OF TRUSTEES IS ESTABLISHED. THE MEMBERS SHALL HAVE SUBSTANTIAL EXPERIENCE WITH MATTERS THAT ARE WITHIN THE SCOPE OF THE BOARD'S AUTHORITY, AND A MAJORITY SHALL HAVE SUBSTANTIAL INVOLVEMENT WITH THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS, SUCH AS EXPERIENCE WITH COMMON SCHOOL OR UNIVERSITY GOVERNANCE OR ADMINISTRATION, TEACHING, OR EDUCATION ADVOCACY. THE GOVERNOR SHALL APPOINT THE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, WITH THE CONSENT OF THE SENATE, FOR STAGGERED TERMS OF UP TO FOUR YEARS IN A MANNER PRESCRIBED BY LAW. THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES SHALL HAVE THE POWERS AND DUTIES PROVIDED BY THIS ARTICLE AND SUCH ADDITIONAL POWERS AND DUTIES RELATED TO THE MANAGEMENT, PLANNING AND DISPOSITION OF SAID LANDS AS MAY BE PRESCRIBED BY LAW.
5. Article X, section 3, Constitution of Arizona, is amended as follows:
Section 3. Mortgage or other encumbrance; sale or lease at public auction; exceptions
A. No mortgage or other encumbrance of the said lands, or any part thereof, shall be valid in favor of any person or for any purpose or under any circumstances whatsoever. Said lands shall not be sold or leased, in whole or in part, except to the highest and best bidder at a public auction to be held at the county seat of the county wherein the lands to be affected, or the major portion thereof, shall lie, notice of which public auction shall first have been duly given by advertisement, which shall set forth the nature, time and place of the transaction to be had, with a full description of the lands to be offered, and be published once each week for not less than ten successive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation published regularly at the state capital, and in that newspaper of like circulation which shall then be regularly published nearest to the location of the lands so offered; nor shall any sale or contract for the sale of any timber or other natural product of such lands be made, save at the place, in the manner, and after the notice by publication provided for sales and leases of the lands themselves, EXCEPT FOR
THE FOLLOWING DISPOSITIONS:
1. PUBLIC OR PRIVATE RIGHTS-OF-WAY ON, OVER, AND ACROSS THE SAID LANDS, INCLUDING FOR ROADWAY, RAILWAY, TRAIL, DRAINAGE, FLOOD CONTROL OR UTILITY PURPOSES.
2. LANDS DESIGNATED AS EDUCATIONAL RESERVE LAND, PERMANENT RESERVE LAND, OR PROVISIONAL RESERVE LAND, OR DESIGNATED FOR CONSERVATION PURPOSES IN A PLAN PREPARED AND APPROVED PURSUANT TO SECTION 4, SUBSECTION C OF THIS ARTICLE.
B. Nothing herein, or elsewhere in article X contained, shall prevent:
1. The leasing of any of the lands referred to in this article in such manner as the legislature may prescribe, for grazing, agricultural, commercial and homesite purposes, for a term of ten years or less, without advertisement;
2. The leasing of any of said lands, in such manner as the legislature may prescribe, whether or not also leased for grazing and agricultural purposes, for mineral purposes, other than for the exploration, development, and production of oil, gas and other hydrocarbon substances, for a term of twenty years or less, without advertisement, or,
3. The leasing of any of said lands, whether or not also leased for other purposes, for the exploration, development, and production of oil, gas and other hydrocarbon substances on, in or under said lands for an initial term of twenty (20) years or less and as long thereafter as oil, gas or other hydrocarbon substance may be procured therefrom in paying quantities, the leases to be made in any manner, with or without advertisement, bidding, or appraisement, and under such terms and provisions, as the Legislature may prescribe, the terms and provisions to include a reservation of a royalty to the state of not less than twelve and one-half per cent of production.
4. THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES FROM PRESCRIBING A METHOD BY WHICH THE HIGHEST AND BEST BID WILL BE DETERMINED TO SAFEGUARD THE INTERESTS OF THE TRUST.
6. Article X, section 4, Constitution of Arizona, is amended as follows:
Section 4. Sale or other disposal; appraisal; consideration and value
A. EXCEPT AS OTHERWISE PROVIDED IN THIS ARTICLE, all lands, lease-holds, timber, and other products of land, before being offered, shall be appraised at their true value, and no sale or other disposal thereof shall be made for a consideration less than the value so ascertained, nor in any case less than the minimum price hereinafter fixed, nor upon credit unless accompanied by ample security. THE, and the legal title shall not be deemed to have passed until the consideration shall have been paid, EXCEPT FOR CONSIDERATION CONSISTING OF A SHARE OF GROSS REVENUES GENERATED BY SUBSEQUENT LEASES OR SALES IF APPROVED BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND IF THERE IS AMPLE SECURITY FOR THE CONSIDERATION.
B. WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, PUBLIC RIGHTS-OF-WAY MAY BE GRANTED ON, OVER AND ACROSS THE SAID LANDS FOR ROADWAY, TRAIL, DRAINAGE, FLOOD CONTROL AND UTILITY PURPOSES FOR NON-MONETARY CONSIDERATION.
C. PLANS FOR THE USE OF THE SAID LANDS SHALL BE PREPARED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE COUNTY, CITY OR TOWN IN WHICH THEY ARE LOCATED AND PURSUANT TO THE GENERALLY APPLICABLE ORDINANCES, REGULATIONS AND RULES OF SUCH COUNTY, CITY OR TOWN, PROVIDED THAT SUCH ORDINANCES, REGULATIONS AND RULES APPLY EQUALLY TO SIMILARLY-SITUATED PRIVATE PROPERTY. WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, A PLAN MAY DESIGNATE ANY PART OF THE TRUST LAND FOR CONSERVATION PURPOSES, AND THAT PART IS SUBJECT TO DISPOSITION TO A QUALIFIED PARTY WITHOUT FURTHER CONSIDERATION IF THE MONETARY OR NONMONETARY CONSIDERATION THAT HAS BEEN OR WILL BE RECEIVED FOR ALL OF THE TRUST LAND THAT IS SUBJECT TO THE PLAN IS AT LEAST EQUAL TO THE TRUE VALUE OF THAT LAND AS DETERMINED WITHOUT RESPECT TO:
1. THE DESIGNATION OF LAND FOR CONSERVATION BEYOND THAT REQUIRED BY LOCAL ORDINANCES, REGULATIONS AND RULES,
2. ANY CHANGES TO THE PLAN THAT ARE PROPOSED IN CONNECTION WITH THE DESIGNATION OF SUCH LAND FOR CONSERVATION, AND
3. ANY OTHER NONMONETARY CONSIDERATION THAT IS PROVIDED IN CONNECTION WITH THE DESIGNATION OF LAND FOR CONSERVATION.
D. IT MUST BE PERMANENT CONDITIONS OF ANY DISPOSITION OF LAND DESIGNATED FOR CONSERVATION PURPOSES PURSUANT TO SUBSECTION C OF THIS SECTION THAT THE LAND WILL BE PERMANENTLY RESTRICTED AGAINST DEVELOPMENT, WILL BE USED IN A MANNER CONSISTENT WITH CONSERVATION, AND WILL BE SUBJECT TO REASONABLE PUBLIC ACCESS.
7. Article X, Constitution of Arizona, is amended by adding section 7.1 as follows:
Section 7.1 Trust land management fund
A. NOTWITHSTANDING THE REQUIREMENTS OF SECTION 7 OF THIS ARTICLE, WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES A PORTION OF THE MONEY TO BE DEPOSITED IN THE PERMANENT FUNDS OR TO BE DISTRIBUTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 7 OF THIS ARTICLE MAY BE TRANSFERRED INTO A TRUST LAND MANAGEMENT FUND, AS FOLLOWS:
1. IF THE BOOK VALUE OF THE PERMANENT FUNDS MANAGED BY THE BOARD OF INVESTMENT IS LESS THAN SEVEN BILLION DOLLARS, AN AMOUNT OF UP TO FIVE PER CENT OF THE MONIES THAT WOULD OTHERWISE HAVE BEEN DEPOSITED IN THE PERMANENT FUND PURSUANT TO SECTION 7 OF THIS ARTICLE AVERAGED OVER THE FIVE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING FISCAL YEARS.
2. IF THE BOOK VALUE OF THE PERMANENT FUNDS MANAGED BY THE BOARD OF INVESTMENT IS MORE THAN FIVE BILLION DOLLARS, UP TO EIGHT PERCENT OF THE MONIES DERIVED FROM RENTALS, INTEREST ON INSTALLMENT SALES, AND DISTRIBUTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT FUND PURSUANT TO SECTION 7 OF THIS ARTICLE AVERAGED OVER THE FIVE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING FISCAL YEARS.
B. THE MANAGEMENT FUND SHALL ONLY BE USED TO SUPPLEMENT FUNDING FOR THE ADMINISTRATION, MANAGEMENT, PLANNING AND DISPOSITION OF THE SAID LANDS, SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION BY THE LEGISLATURE. THE MONIES IN THE MANAGEMENT FUND ARE NOT SUBJECT TO ANY PROVISION FOR LAPSING OR REVERSION OF MONIES, EXCEPT THAT IF THE BALANCE IN THE FUND AT THE END OF ANY FISCAL YEAR EXCEEDS TWO TIMES THE TRUST-RELATED OPERATING BUDGET FOR THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR, THE EXCESS AMOUNT SHALL BE CREDITED TO THE SEVERAL PERMANENT FUNDS ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO THIS ARTICLE. NOTHING IN THIS SECTION SHALL PREVENT THE LEGISLATURE FROM LAWFULLY APPROPRIATING GENERAL FUNDS FOR THE PURPOSES DESCRIBED IN THIS SECTION.
8. Article X, Constitution of Arizona, is amended by adding section 12 as follows:
Section 12. Designated conservation reserve lands for educational reserve, permanent reserve, and provisional reserve.
A. THOSE LANDS HELD IN TRUST BY THE STATE OF ARIZONA PURSUANT TO SECTION 1 OF THIS ARTICLE THAT ARE LOCATED WITHIN THE AREAS DESCRIBED IN THIS SECTION ARE DESIGNATED AS EDUCATIONAL RESERVE LANDS, PERMANENT RESERVE LANDS, OR PROVISIONAL RESERVE LANDS, AS FOLLOWS:
1. APACHE JUNCTION . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 7-9, N1/2 OF SECTION 10, W1/2 OF SECTION 14 EXCEPT FOR THE E1/2NW1/4, SECTIONS 23, 26, NE1/4NE1/4 OF SECTION 35, T1N R8E, PINAL COUNTY. 2. BADGER PEAK . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 1-3, 10, 11, T13N R2W, YAVAPAI COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 36, T14N R2W, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 3. BLM WILDERNESS INHOLDINGS . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 16, T10N R13W; SECTION 16, T8N R11W; SECTION 32, T2N R11W; ALL IN LA PAZ COUNTY. SECTIONS 1-5, T1S R11W, YUMA COUNTY. SECTION 2, T11N R10W; SECTION 16, T11N R9W; N1/2 AND NW1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 14, SECTION 29, T9N R3W; ALL IN YAVAPAI COUNTY. SECTIONS 16, 32, T4N R8W, MARICOPA COUNTY. SECTION 36, T11S R19E; SECTIONS 19, 20, 29, 31, T11S R20E; ALL IN GRAHAM COUNTY. 4. BUCKHORN MOUNTAIN STATE PARK . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 23, T13N R20W, MOHAVE COUNTY. 5. BURRO CREEK . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 28, 33-35, T16.5N R9W; SECTIONS 5, 7, 8, 18, 19, T16N R9W; ALL IN YAVAPAI COUNTY. 6. CATALINA GALIURO CORRIDOR . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 32, T11S R20E, GRAHAM COUNTY. E1/2 OF SECTION 1, SECTIONS 12, 13, E1/2 AND SW1/4 OF SECTION 14, SW1/4 OF SECTION 19, S1/2NE1/4 AND S1/2 OF SECTION 20, S1/2NE1/4 AND SE1/4 OF SECTION 21, SECTIONS 22-32, 34, 35, T12S R19E; SECTIONS 5-9, 16-18, T12S R20E; SECTIONS 1, 2, NE1/4 OF SECTION 3, SECTIONS 5-12, 14, NE1/4NE1/4 OF SECTION 15, SECTIONS 16-21, 29, 30, T13S R19E; SECTIONS 5-7, NW1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 8, T13S R20E; ALL IN COCHISE COUNTY. SECTIONS 1, 3-5, 8-16, 21-23, 25-27, T13S R18E, PIMA COUNTY. 7. CATALINA STATE PARK . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SW1/4 OF SECTION 16, SECTIONS 17, 18, 21, S1/2 OF SECTION 22, SW1/4 OF SECTION 23, T11S R14E, PIMA COUNTY. 8. CAVE CREEK RECREATION AREA . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: E1/2SE1/4 OF SECTION 23, E1/2 OF SECTION 26, SECTION 36, T6N R3E, MARICOPA COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 29, 32, T6N R4E, MARICOPA COUNTY. 9. CENTENNIAL FOREST . (A) EDUCATIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 21, 22, 26-28, 31-34, T21N R6E; SECTION 2, T21N R8E; SECTIONS 2, 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, T20N R5E; SECTIONS 2, 4-6, 8, 10, 17, 18, 20, 28, 30, 32, 34, T20N R6E; SECTION 3, T19N R5E; SECTIONS 5, 6, T19N R6E; ALL IN COCONINO COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 1- 4, 9-16, T25N R6E; SECTIONS 1-18, T25N R7E; SECTIONS 4-9, 16-18, T25N R8E; ALL IN COCONINO COUNTY. 10. CIENEGA CREEK . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 35, 36, T16S R16E; SW1/4 OF SECTION 17, SECTIONS 18-20, S1/2 OF SECTION 21, SECTION 25, W1/2 OF SECTION 26, SECTIONS 27-33, THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTION 34 LYING NORTH OF INTERSTATE HIGHWAY 10, SECTIONS 35, 36, T16S R17E; SECTION 1, NE1/4, E1/2NW1/4 AND E1/2SE1/4 OF SECTION 2, NE1/4, E1/2NW1/4 AND E1/2SE1/4 OF SECTION 12, T17S R16E; THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTIONS 1-3 LYING NORTH OF INTERSTATE HIGHWAY 10, SECTIONS 4-9, 16, E1/2 OF SECTION 19, SECTIONS 29-32, T17S R17E; ALL IN PIMA COUNTY. SECTIONS 15, 16, 23, 26, 35, 36, T20S R18E, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 10-16, E1/2 OF SECTION 17, N1/2 OF SECTION 21, SECTION 23, E1/2 OF SECTION 26, THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTION 34 LYING SOUTH OF INTERSTATE HIGHWAY 10, T16S R17E; THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTIONS 1-3 LYING SOUTH OF INTERSTATE HIGHWAY 10, SECTIONS 10-15, 17, 18, W1/2 OF SECTION 19, SECTIONS 20-28, 33-36, T17S R17E; THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTION 4 LYING SOUTH OF INTERSTATE HIGHWAY 10, SECTIONS 5-8, W1/2 OF SECTION 14, SECTIONS 15, 17-22, 27-36, T17S R18E; SECTIONS 24-26, 35, 36, T18S R16E; SECTIONS 1-3, 7, 10-16, 20-25, 27-30, 32-34, 36, T18S R17E; SECTIONS 2-11, 14-23, 26, 27, 29-35, T18S R18E; SECTIONS 1, 2, T19S R16E; SECTIONS 1-6, 16, 26, 35, 36, T19S R17E; SECTIONS 2-6, 8-10, 15, 16, 20, 21, 28, 29, 32, T19S R18E; ALL IN PIMA COUNTY. SECTIONS 1-3, 11-14, 23, T20S R17E; THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTION 2 LYING SOUTH OF STATE HIGHWAY 82, SECTIONS 6, 7, 10, 11, 13, 14, 18, 19, 24, 25, T20S R18E; ALL IN SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 11. CONTINENTAL MOUNTAIN . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 2, T6N R4E, MARICOPA COUNTY. 12. CORONADO NATIONAL MEMORIAL . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 16, T24S R21E, COCHISE COUNTY. 13. DAISY MOUNTAIN . PERMANENT RESERVE: W1/2SW1/4 OF SECTION 6, W1/2 OF SECTION 7, T6N R3E; S1/2NE1/4, NW1/4 AND SE1/4 OF SECTION 1, SECTION 12 EXCEPT FOR THE NW1/4NW1/4 AND S1/2S1/2, T6N R2E; ALL IN MARICOPA COUNTY. 14. DRAGOON MOUNTAINS WILDLIFE CORRIDOR . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 34, T18S R21E; SECTIONS 1-4, 9-12, 16, T19S R21E; SECTIONS 1-4, 7-12, T19S R22E; SECTIONS 26-28, 33-35, T18S R23E; SECTIONS 3-7, T19S R23E; ALL IN COCHISE COUNTY. 15. GLASSFORD HILL . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: E1/2 OF SECTION 17, N1/2 AND N1/2SE1/4 OF SECTION 20, T14N R1W, YAVAPAI COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 8 EXCEPT FOR THE NE1/4, SECTION 16 EXCEPT FOR THE E1/2E1/2, W1/2 OF SECTION 17, SE1/4 OF SECTION 18, NE1/4 OF SECTION 19, S1/2S1/2 OF SECTION 20, T14N R1W, YAVAPAI COUNTY. 16. GOLD CANYON . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 29 EXCEPT FOR THE SW1/4SW1/4, E1/2NE1/4 AND N1/2NE1/4SE1/4 OF SECTION 30, T1N R9E, PINAL COUNTY. 17. GRAND CANYON SCENIC CORRIDOR . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 14, 23, 24, T28N R2E; SECTION 19, T28N R3E; ALL IN COCONINO COUNTY. 18. HOMOLOVI RUINS STATE PARK . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SE1/4 OF SECTION 30, SECTIONS 32, 34, T20N R16E; SECTION 8, W1/2 OF SECTION 10, SECTIONS 16, 22, T19N R16E; ALL IN NAVAJO COUNTY. 19. IRONWOOD NATIONAL MONUMENT . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 22-27, 34-36, T10S R8E; SECTIONS 19, 20, T10S R9E; ALL IN PINAL COUNTY. 20. KARTCHNER CAVERNS CORRIDOR . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 36, T18S R19E; SECTION 19, S1/2 OF SECTIONS 32-34, T18S R20E; SECTION 1, T19S R19E; S1/2 OF SECTIONS 1 AND 2, SECTION 3, N1/2 OF SECTIONS 4-6, N1/2 OF SECTION 10, SECTIONS 11, 12, T19S R20E; SECTIONS 6, 7, T19S R21E; ALL IN COCHISE COUNTY. 21. KINGMAN . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 2 EXCEPT FOR THE E1/2E1/2, T21N R17W, MOJAVE COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: E1/2E1/2 OF SECTION 2, T21N R17W, MOJAVE COUNTY. 22. LAKE HAVASU CITY . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: S1/2NE1/4 AND SE1/4 OF SECTION 32, T14N R19W; W1/2NW1/4 AND SW1/4 OF SECTION 4, T13N R19W; ALL IN MOHAVE COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: N1/2NW1/4 OF SECTION 13, N1/2NE1/4 OF SECTION 14, T14N R20W; SW1/4 OF SECTION 20, T14N R19W; ALL IN MOJAVE COUNTY. 23. LAKE PLEASANT RECREATION AREA . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 35, 36, T7N R1E; SECTIONS 1, 2, N1/2 OF SECTIONS 11 AND 12, T6N R1E; ALL IN MARICOPA COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SW1/4 OF SECTION 30 EXCEPT FOR THE NE1/4 SW1/4, SECTION 31 EXCEPT FOR THE S1/2SE1/4, T7N R2E; S1/2 OF SECTION 11, N1/2 AND N1/2S1/2 OF SECTION 14, N1/2SE1/4 OF SECTION 15, T6N R1E; ALL IN MARICOPA COUNTY. 24. LESLIE CREEK . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 32, T20S R28E; SECTIONS 10, 13-16, 21-27, T21S R28E; ALL IN COCHISE COUNTY. 25. LITTLE COLORADO RIVER . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 13-18, T8N R28E, APACHE COUNTY. 26. LOWER SAN PEDRO . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: NE1/4 OF SECTION 36, T13S R19E; E1/2 OF SECTION 4, SW1/4 OF SECTION 10, NW1/4 OF SECTION 15, SE1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 32, T15S R20E, ALL IN COCHISE COUNTY. E1/2 OF SECTION 36, T5S R15E; SECTION 15, NE1/4 OF SECTION 16, SE1/4 OF SECTION 35, T7S R16E; NE1/4NE1/4 OF SECTION 2, E1/2NW1/4 AND SE1/4SE1/4 OF SECTION 12, T8S R16E; E1/2 OF SECTION 32, T8S R17E; SW1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 32, T9S R18E; SECTION 5, W1/2NW1/41/4 OF SECTION 9, SECTION 16, NW1/4 SECTION 21, T10S R18E; ALL IN PINAL COUNTY. 27. LYMAN LAKE STATE PARK . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: N1/2 OF SECTION 15, NE1/4NE1/4 OF SECTION 16, T11N R28E, APACHE COUNTY. 28. MALPAI . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 21, 22, 27-29, 33, T20S R30E; SECTIONS 2, 4, 9, 10, 14-16, 22, 25-27, 35, 36, T21S R30E; SECTION 31, T21S R31E; SECTIONS 1-3, 10, 11, T22S R30E; SECTIONS 5-10, 15-18, T22S R31E; E1/2 OF SECTION 10, SECTION 15, S1/2 OF SECTION 16, SECTIONS 21-24, 26-28, 33, 34, T23S R30E; E1/2 OF SECTION 33, SECTIONS 34, 35, T23S R31E; SE1/4SE1/4 OF SECTION 1, SECTIONS 4, 7, 8, 15, 16, E1/2 OF SECTION 18, W1/2E1/2 OF SECTION 19, SECTION 21, T24S R30E; SECTIONS 1-4, SW1/4 AND SW1/4SE1/4 OF SECTION 6, SECTION 7 EXCEPT FOR THE NE1/4NE1/4, SECTIONS 9-16, 18-24, T24S R31E; SECTIONS 6-8, 17-20, T24S R32E; ALL IN COCHISE COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 34, T21S R30E; SECTIONS 11, 14, T23S R30E; ALL IN COCHISE COUNTY 29. MCDOWELL SONORAN PRESERVE . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 1, E1/2E1/2 OF SECTION 2, E1/2E1/2 OF SECTION 11, SECTIONS 12, 13, E1/2NE1/4 AND NE1/4SE1/4 OF SECTION 14, E1/2 OF SECTION 24, T5N R5E; SECTIONS 1, 2, 11, 12, T3N R5E; ALL IN MARICOPA COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: THOSE LANDS LOCATED WITHIN T5N R5E AND T4N R5E, MARICOPA COUNTY, THAT WERE CLASSIFIED AS SUITABLE FOR CONSERVATION PURPOSES BY THE STATE LAND COMMISSIONER PURSUANT TO ORDER NO. 211-97/98 ON JANUARY 21, 1998, ORDER NO. 303-99/00 ON MAY 17, 2000, AND ORDER NO. 078-2001/2002 ON AUGUST 30, 2001, EXCEPTING THE RELEVANT PORTIONS OF APPROXIMATELY 1630 ACRES TO BE SOLD WITHOUT PATENT RESTRICTIONS PURSUANT TO ORDER NO. 078-2001/2002, AND EXCEPTING THOSE LANDS DESIGNATED AS PERMANENT RESERVE LANDS PURSUANT TO THIS PARAGRAPH. 30. MIDDLE VERDE . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 7, SECTION 16 EXCEPT FOR THE W1/2SW1/4, NW1/4 OF SECTION 18, T16N R4E, YAVAPAI COUNTY; (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: E1/2NE1/4 AND N1/2NE1/4SE1/4 OF SECTION 32, T15N R4E; E1/2E1/2 OF SECTION 2, T14N R4E; NW1/4NE1/4 OF SECTION 32, T14N R5E; ALL IN YAVAPAI COUNTY. 31. OBSERVATORY MESA . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 12, T21N R6E; SECTION 18, T21N R7E; ALL IN COCONINO COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 6, 8, T21N R7E, COCONINO COUNTY. 32. ORACLE . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 22, 27, 30, 31, 34, T9S R16E; SECTION 24, T10S R14E; SECTIONS 4, 5, S1/2SW1/4 AND SW1/4SE1/4 OF SECTION 8, SECTIONS 9, 10, 17, T10S R15E; ALL IN PINAL COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 31, 32, SECTION 33 EXCEPT FOR THE NE1/4, SW1/4 OF SECTION 34, T9S R15E; SECTION 16, T9S R16E; SECTION 3, T10S R15E; ALL IN PINAL COUNTY. 33. PATAGONIA LAKE STATE PARK . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: THOSE STATE TRUST LANDS SURROUNDING PATAGONIA LAKE STATE PARK, LYING WITHIN THE LUIS MARIA BACA FLOAT #3 AND THE SAN JOSE DE SONOITA LAND GRANTS, ALL IN SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 34. PHOENIX SONORAN PRESERVE . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: N1/2 AND SE1/4 OF SECTION 7, W1/2 OF SECTION 15, NW1/4 AND S1/2 OF SECTION 16, N1/2NE1/4 OF SECTION 17, S1/2S1/2NE1/4 AND S1/2 OF SECTION 19, SW1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 20, T5N R3E; W1/2 OF SECTION 29, T5N R2E; ALL IN MARICOPA COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: THOSE LANDS LOCATED WITHIN T4N R3E, T5N R2E, T5N R3E, T6N R2E, AND SECTIONS 6 AND 7 OF T5N R4E, MARICOPA COUNTY, THAT WERE CLASSIFIED AS SUITABLE FOR CONSERVATION PURPOSES BY THE STATE LAND COMMISSIONER AS OF JUNE 26, 2002, AS SUCH CLASSIFICATIONS WERE AMENDED BY ORDER NO. 361-2001/2002 ON JUNE 26, 2002, AND EXCEPTING THOSE LANDS DESIGNATED AS PERMANENT RESERVE LANDS PURSUANT TO THIS PARAGRAPH. 35. PICACHO MOUNTAINS . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 36, T6S R9E; SECTIONS 31-33, T6S R10E; SECTIONS 1, 12, 13, 24, 25, THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTION 34 LYING EAST OF THE CAP CANAL, SECTIONS 35, 36, T7S R9E; SECTIONS 4, 9, 16, 19-21, T7S R10E; SECTION 1, THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTION 4 LYING EAST OF THE CAP CANAL, THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTION 9 LYING EAST OF THE CAP CANAL, SECTIONS 12, 13, THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTION 16 LYING EAST OF THE CAP CANAL, THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTION 21 LYING EAST OF THE CAP CANAL, SECTIONS 24, 25, 28, 33-36, T8S R9E; SECTION 3, T9S R9E; ALL IN PINAL COUNTY. 36. PICACHO PEAK STATE PARK . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 4, THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTION 10 LYING NORTH OF INTERSTATE HIGHWAY 10 EXCEPT FOR ANY LANDS UNDER COMMERCIAL LEASE AS OF THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS SECTION 12 OF ARTICLE X, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA, SECTION 16, T9S R9E, PINAL COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 5, 8, THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTION 10 LYING SOUTH OF INTERSTATE HIGHWAY 10, SECTIONS 17, 20, T9S R9E, PINAL COUNTY. 37. RAINBOW VALLEY . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 13, T2S R1W; SECTIONS 21, 28, T3S R1W; SECTION 2, T4S R1E; ALL IN MARICOPA COUNTY. 38.RINCON VALLEY . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 17-20, 28-33, T15S R17E; SECTIONS 5-7, T16S R17E; ALL IN PIMA COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 7, T15S R17E, PIMA COUNTY. 39. SAGUARO NATIONAL PARK . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 36, T12S R11E; SECTION 32, T12S R12E; SECTION 32, T13S R11E; SECTIONS 16, 28, 32, 33, T13S R12E; ALL IN PIMA COUNTY. 40. SAN TAN MOUNTAINS REGIONAL PARK . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 10, 15, T3S R7E, PINAL COUNTY. 41. SANTA CRUZ WILDLIFE CORRIDOR . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 36, T19S R13E; SECTION 31, T19S R14E; ALL IN PIMA COUNTY. SECTIONS 1-4, 11, 13, 20, 24, T20S R13E, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 32-35, T19S R13E, PIMA COUNTY. SECTIONS 10, 14-17, 23, T20S R13E, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 42. SANTA RITA EXPERIMENTAL RANGE . (A) EDUCATIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 33-36, T17S R14E; SECTIONS 31-35, T17S R15E; SECTIONS 24, 25, T18S R13E; SECTIONS 1-4, 9-16, 21-36, T18S R14E; SECTIONS 3-9, 16-21, 26-34, T18S R15E; SECTIONS 1-6, 9-16, 23, T19S R14E; SECTIONS 3-10, 16-18, T19S R15E; ALL IN PIMA COUNTY. 43. SAWTOOTH . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 24, 25, 35, NW1/4 AND W1/2SW1/4 OF SECTION 36, T9S R6E; SECTIONS 2, 10, T10S R6E; ALL IN PINAL COUNTY. 44. SAN PEDRO RIPARIAN NCA . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 34-36, T22S R22E; SECTIONS 29, 31, 32, T22S R23E; SECTION 2, T23S R20E; SECTION 23, T23S R22E; ALL IN COCHISE COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 26, 27, 35, T21S R21E; SECTIONS 1, 12, 13, T22S R21E; NE1/4SE1/4 OF SECTION 3, SECTIONS 10, 16, T22S R22E; SECTION 11, T23S R22E; ALL IN COCHISE COUNTY. 45. SIERRITA MOUNTAINS . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 32-34, 36, T17S R10E; SECTIONS 2-5, 8-10, 14, 16, 17, 20, 21, 23, 25-29, 32-36, T18S R10E; SECTIONS 19, 26, 28, 29, 31-36, T18S R11E; W1/2 OF SECTION 30, T18S R12E; SECTIONS 1-5, 8-36, T19S R10E; SECTIONS 2-5, 7-14, 17-36, T19S R11E; SECTIONS 2, 3, S1/2 OF SECTIONS 4 AND 5, SECTIONS 6-11, 13-20, 22-24, 31, 32, T19S R12E; SECTIONS 6, 7, 18, 19, T19S R13E; SECTIONS 13, 23-25, T20S R9E; SECTIONS 1-9, 11, 12, 14, N1/2 OF SECTION 17, N1/2 AND N1/2SW1/4 OF SECTION 18, SECTIONS 21, 23, 26, 27, N1/2 OF SECTION 31, SECTIONS 33-35, T20S R10E; SECTIONS 2-8, SECTIONS 13, 14, N1/2 OF SECTIONS 17 AND 18, SECTIONS 22-26, 28, 31-33, 36, T20S R11E; SECTIONS 1-3, 10, 11, W1/2E1/2 AND W1/2 OF SECTION 12, N1/2 OF SECTION 13, SECTIONS 14, NW1/4 AND S1/2 OF SECTION 18, N1/2 OF SECTION 19, SECTIONS 20, 21, T21S R10E; SECTIONS 5, 6, T21S R11E; ALL IN PIMA COUNTY. SECTIONS 6, 7, 10, 11, 15-21, W1/2 OF SECTION 26, SECTIONS 27-33, T20S R12E, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 46. SPRINGERVILLE GRASSLANDS . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: E1/2 OF SECTION 7, NW1/4 OF SECTION 8, SECTION 17, E1/2 OF SECTION 18, SECTION 19, N1/2 AND SE1/4 OF SECTION 20, T9N R29E; SECTIONS 1, 2, 11-14, T8N R27E; SECTION 1, SECTION 2 EXCEPT FOR THE N 920 FEET AND W 700 FEET OF SW1/4SW1/4, E1/2, NW1/4 AND N1/2SW1/4 OF SECTION 5, SECTION 6, NE1/4 OF SECTION 11, NW1/4 OF SECTION 12, T8N R28E; ALL IN APACHE COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 25, 36, T9N R27E; SECTION 19 EXCEPT FOR THE NE1/4NW1/4 AND W1/2NW1/4, SECTIONS 20, 21, 28-33, T9N R28E; SECTIONS 3, 4, SE1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 5, SECTIONS 8-10, T8N R28E; ALL IN APACHE COUNTY. 47. SPUR CROSS RANCH CONSERVATION AREA . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 4, S1/2NE1/4 AND N1/2SE1/4 OF SECTION 7, N1/2 AND N1/2NW1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 8; N1/2 AND N1/2S1/2 OF SECTION 9, T6N R4E, MARICOPA COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 1, SE1/4 SECTION 2, T6N R3E; S1/2NW1/4SW1/4 AND SW1/4SW1/4 AND NE1/4SE1/4 SECTION 8, S1/2S1/2 OF SECTION 9, SECTION 16, T6N R4E; ALL IN MARICOPA COUNTY. 48. SUPERSTITION MOUNTAINS . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 31-36, T1N R10E; SECTIONS 1-6, N1/2 OF SECTION 8, SECTIONS 9-16, 21-23, 27, E1/2 OF SECTION 28, NE1/4NE1/4 OF SECTION 33, NW1/4NW1/4 OF SECTION 34, T1S R10E; ALL IN PINAL COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: N1/2 OF SECTION 34, SECTIONS 35, 36, T1N R9E, PINAL COUNTY. 49. TORTOLITA FAN . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 1-3, THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTIONS 4, 9, AND 10 LYING EAST OF THE CAP CANAL, SECTIONS 11-15, THOSE PORTIONS OF SECTIONS 23 AND 24 LYING EAST OF THE CAP CANAL, T11S R11E; SECTIONS 6, 7, 18, 19, N1/2 AND SW1/4 OF SECTION 20, W1/2 OF SECTION 29, SECTIONS 30, 31, N1/2 OF SECTIONS 32 AND 33, NW1/4 OF SECTION 34, T11S R12E; ALL IN PIMA COUNTY. 50. TORTOLITA MOUNTAIN PARK . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: E1/2 AND S1/2SW1/4 OF SECTION 32, SECTION 33, T10S R12E, PINAL COUNTY. SECTIONS 2-5, 8-17, NE1/4 OF SECTION 23, SECTION 24, T11S R12E, PIMA COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 1-5, 10-13, 16, T11S R13E, PIMA COUNTY. 51.T UCSON MOUNTAIN PARK . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 2, T14S R12E; SECTION 33, T14S R13E; SECTION 11, T15S R13E; ALL IN PIMA COUNTY. 52. TUMAMOC HILL . PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 9, 10, 15, 16, T14S R13E, PIMA COUNTY. 53. UPPER CHINO VALLEY GRASSLANDS . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, T21N R5W; SECTIONS 20, 28, 30, 32, T21N R4W; SECTIONS 2, 4, 10, 12, 14, 16, 22, 24, 26, ALL OF THE LAND LYING NORTH AND EAST OF THE NWSE DIAGONAL OF SECTION 28, SECTION 36, T20N R5W; SECTIONS 4, 6, 10, 16, 18, 20, 22, 26, 28, 30, 34, 36, T20N R4W; SECTIONS 2, 6, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, T19N R4W; SECTION 30, T19N R3W; SECTIONS 10, 12, 14, 22, 24, 26, 28, 36, T18N R4W; SECTIONS 6, 14, 18, 24, 28, 30, 32, 34, T18N R3W; SECTION 20, T18N R2W; SECTION 2, T17N R4W; SECTIONS 2, 10, 12, 14, 16, 20, 22, N1/2 OF SECTIONS 26 AND 28, T17N R3W; SECTIONS 6, 8, 18, T17N R2W; ALL IN YAVAPAI COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTIONS 2, 4, E1/2 OF SECTION 6, SECTIONS 8, 10, 12, T21N R5W; SECTION 18, T19N R4W; SECTIONS 20, 28, 34, T19N R3W; SECTIONS 4, 10, T17N R4W; ALL IN YAVAPAI COUNTY. 54. VERDE HEADWATERS . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 32, T18N R1W; SECTIONS 1, 3, 10, SECTION 11 EXCEPT FOR THE W1/2NE1/4SW1/4 AND E1/2W1/2SE1/4, SECTIONS 12, 14, 23, T17N R2W; SECTIONS 5-7, T17N R1W; ALL IN YAVAPAI COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 36, T18N R2W; SECTIONS 30, 31, T18N R1W; ALL IN YAVAPAI COUNTY. 55. WALNUT CANYON NATIONAL MONUMENT . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 22, 28, T21N R8E, COCONINO COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 30, T21N R8E, COCONINO COUNTY. 56. WHITE TANKS . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 16, N1/2 OF SECTION 32, T2N R3W, MARICOPA COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 36, T4N R4W; SECTION 31, T4N R3W; SECTIONS 1, 2, 11, 14, 23-26, 35, 36, T3N R4W; SECTIONS 1, 2, T2N R3W; ALL IN MARICOPA COUNTY. 57. WICKENBURG . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTION 32, T7N R4W, MARICOPA COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 31, T8N R4W; THOSE LANDS LOCATED IN SECTIONS 7, 8, 16 AND 21 CLASSIFIED AS SUITABLE FOR CONSERVATION PURPOSES BY THE STATE LAND COMMISSIONER PURSUANT TO ORDER NO. 184-2001/2002 ON NOVEMBER 28, 2001, SECTIONS 24, 25, SECTION 26 EXCEPT FOR THE N1/2N1/2, SECTIONS 35, 36, T7N R5W; N1/2 OF SECTION 6, SECTIONS 20, 21, T7N R4W; ALL IN MARICOPA COUNTY. 58. WOODY MESA . (A) PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 14, 22, T20N R6E, COCONINO COUNTY. (B) PROVISIONAL RESERVE: SECTION 12, T20N R6E; SECTION 6, T20N R7E; ALL IN COCONINO COUNTY. 59. WUPATKI NATIONAL MONUMENT . PERMANENT RESERVE: SECTIONS 24, 26, 36, T26N R8E; SECTIONS 20, 22, 26, 28, 30, 34, 36, T26N R9E; SECTION 30, T26N R10E; ALL IN COCONINO COUNTY. BOARD OF TRUSTEES MAY MAKE CORRESPONDING ADJUSTMENTS TO THE LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS OF THE EDUCATIONAL, PERMANENT, AND PROVISIONAL RESERVE LANDS PROVIDED IN THIS SECTION. 9. Maps of conservation reserve lands.
The following maps describe the lands designated as educational reserve lands, permanent reserve lands, and provisional reserve lands pursuant to section 8 of this proposition. These maps are provided for illustrative purposes only and the legal descriptions provided in section 8 of this proposition shall control in the event of any inconsistency.
1. Apache Junction
2. Badger Peak
3. BLM Wilderness Inholdings
4. Buckhorn Mountain State Park
5. Burro Creek
6. Catalina Galiuro Corridor
7. Catalina State Park
8. Cave Creek Recreation Area
9. Centennial Forest
10. Cienega Creek
11. Continental Mountain
12. Coronado National Memorial
13. Daisy Mountain
14. Dragoon Mountains Wildlife Corridor
15. Glassford Hill
16. Gold Canyon
17. Grand Canyon Scenic Corridor
18. Homolovi Ruins State Park
19. Ironwood National Monument
20. Kartchner Caverns Corridor
21. Kingman
22. Lake Havasu City
23. Lake Pleasant Recreation Area
24. Leslie Creek
25. Little Colorado River
26. Lower San Pedro
27. Lyman Lake State Park
28. Malpai
29. McDowell Sonoran Preserve
30. Middle Verde
31. Observatory Mesa
32. Oracle State Park
33. Patagonia Lake State Park
34. Phoenix Sonoran Preserve
35. Picacho Mountains
36. Picacho Peak State Park
37. Rainbow Valley
38. Rincon Valley
39. Saguaro National Park
40. San Tan Mountains Regional Park
41. Santa Cruz Wildlife Corridor
42. Santa Rita Experimental Range
43. Sawtooth
44. San Pedro Riparian NCA
45. Sierrita Mountains
46. Springerville Grasslands
47. Spur Cross Ranch Conservation Area
48. Superstition Mountains
49. Tortolita Fan
50. Tortolita Mountain Park
51. Tucson Mountain Park
52. Tumamoc Hill
53. Upper Chino Valley Grasslands
54. Verde Headwaters
55. Walnut Canyon National Monument
56. White Tanks
57. Wickenburg
58. Woody Mesa
59. Wupatki National Monument
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10. Conditional enactment
This proposition is not effective unless on or before December 31, 2008, sections 20 through 35 of the Arizona-New Mexico Enabling Act (Act of June 20, 1910; 36 Stat. 568 through 579; chapter 310) are amended by Congress and signed into law to authorize the State of Arizona to fully implement and exercise the authorities provided by the amendments to the Constitution of Arizona proposed by sections 1 through 8 of this proposition. On or before December 31, 2008, the state land commissioner shall notify the director of legislative council in writing whether this condition occurred and the date the enabling act was amended.
11. Submission to voters
The Secretary of State shall submit this proposition to the voters at the next general election as provided by article XXI, Section 1, Constitution of Arizona.

ANALYSIS BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL
In 1910, the United States Congress passed the Arizona-New Mexico Enabling Act, allowing Arizona to become a state. The Enabling Act granted Arizona 10.9 million acres of land, referred to as "state trust land", to be held in trust for the benefit of the named beneficiaries, primarily the public schools, as well as other public institutions (colleges, hospitals, prisons, etc.). Both the Enabling Act and the Arizona Constitution provide that the state can lease or sell trust land, and the natural products (timber, minerals, etc.) of the land, to the "highest and best bidder" at advertised public auction and lands and products offered for sale must be appraised at and sold for not less than "true value". Proposition 106 would amend the Arizona Constitution to:
1. Create a new seven member Board of Trustees appointed by the Governor, with the consent of the State Senate, to plan and dispose of all state trust lands. A majority of the members must have substantial involvement with public schools, such as university governance or administration, teaching or education advocacy. The costs associated with the Board are to be paid with a portion of the proceeds (5% - 8%) derived from the sale or lease of trust lands. Currently, all of the proceeds go to benefit schools and other beneficiaries of the state trust.
2. Create a Conservation Reserve, consisting of approximately 694,000 acres of state trust land, to be managed by a Board of Trustees. This trust land would no longer be available for sale to provide revenue for schools and other public institutions, although some revenue from leasing may be realized.
3. Generally the land in the Conservation Reserve must be restricted against "development" and be managed in a manner consistent with "conservation", but not required to be accessible to the public unless and until conveyed out of the state land trust, as those terms are defined in this proposal, and subject to the following:
a. Any lease, right-of-way or other use in existence when this provision is enacted may continue.
b. "Educational" reserve land may be conveyed to the Arizona Board of Regents for research and education. Buildings may be constructed on up to 50 acres of educational reserve land to support university programs.
c. "Permanent" reserve land may be conveyed by the Trustees to state or local governmental entities without payment, unless the land is leased for grazing.
d. "Provisional" reserve land may be conveyed by the Trustees to federal, state or local governmental entities or nonprofit conservation organizations upon payment of the true value of the land. Payment may be made in monetary or other forms of value that can be demonstrated by an appraisal. Provisional reserve lands not conveyed within a specified period of time may be removed from the Conservation Reserve and then treated in the same manner as other state trust land.
4. Allow the Board of Trustees to adopt a method for determining the "highest and best bid" that does not require the highest return to the state trust.
5. Provide that the Board of Trustees may convey title to state trust lands in exchange for an agreement to receive a share of anticipated gross revenues generated by the subsequent lease or sale of the land.
6. Allow the Board of Trustees to grant public rights-of-way over state trust land, without conducting an advertised public auction, in exchange for any form of value that can be demonstrated by an appraisal.
7. Require that land use planning for state trust lands be prepared in conjunction with the county, city or town where the land is located, according to generally applicable regulations that apply equally to similar private property in the jurisdiction. If the land use plan designates a part of the trust land for conservation, the Board of Trustees may convey that portion of the land to a state or local governmental entity without compensation, if the total compensation for all of the trust land subject to the plan is or will be at least equal to the "true value" of all of the subject land. The designated conservation land must be restricted against "development" and be managed in a manner consistent with "conservation" but not required to be accessible to the public unless and until conveyed out of the state land trust.
8. Allow the Board of Trustees to set aside a portion of the proceeds generated from state trust lands for the administration, management, planning and disposition of the land.
Proposition 106 does not become fully effective unless the United States Congress amends the Arizona-New Mexico Enabling Act prior to 2009 to authorize the changes contained in this proposal.

Fiscal Impact Statement
State law requires the Joint Legislative Budget Committee (JLBC) Staff to prepare a summary of the fiscal impact of certain ballot measures. Proposition 106 contains provisions that may increase future revenues to state trust land beneficiaries and other provisions that may reduce revenues that otherwise would have been received by these beneficiaries. The proposition sets aside a percent of the proceeds from the disposition of state trust land for trust land administration. This provision may initially provide up to $6 million annually from proceeds that would otherwise have been invested for the beneficiaries. The additional administrative funding may permit the state to prepare trust land parcels for sale or lease more quickly, which may accelerate revenues to beneficiaries. The value of land generally appreciates over time. If state trust land is sold earlier under the proposition, the longer term fiscal impact may depend, at least in part, on the rate of investment returns of the accelerated revenue compared to the sale price at a later date.
The proposition would permit certain parcels of trust land to be used for conservation without compensation. In this circumstance, the trust beneficiaries would not receive the proceeds from the sale of this land. The level of foregone revenue is difficult to predict in advance.

ARGUMENTS "FOR" PROPOSITION 106
CONSERVING ARIZONA'S FUTURE
A WIN-WIN SITUATION
The Conserving Arizona's Future Initiative is supported by a wide range of Arizonans, including leading conservation organizations, teachers, educators, and both Republican and Democratic leaders. We all back this initiative because it gives us an opportunity to protect 690,000 acres of state trust land, manage the future growth of Arizona, and protect our open space, water and air. And it does all this while increasing essential funding for Arizona's public schools. Now is the time to protect our state trust land. Without this measure, Arizona could soon lose some of our most precious state lands to uncontrolled and unmanaged growth. For those of us who care about saving Arizona's most beautiful places and making our beautiful State even a better place to live with even better education for our children, this is a win-win initiative. Please join me in voting YES on Conserving Arizona's Future.
Janet Napolitano, Governor, Phoenix

Improve Trust Land Management - Increase Educational Funding Conserving Arizona's Future is a ballot measure that will promote increased funding to education through better management of state trust lands. Right now the state has approximately nine million acres of land that can be sold to benefit education. This land was given to the state by the federal government, and over the years has been used to generate a significant amount of funds for public education. However, the amount of money raised for education could be increased by better management of the sale of trust land. This year, 4% of the Classroom Site Fund came from sales of trust land, but this amount could grow to 25-50% by 2015. With the passage of this ballot measure, the sale of trust lands would provide a stable and significant funding source for classrooms. Changes that the measure proposes are simply good business strategies. For example, a Board of Trustees will be created to oversee trust management. The Conserving Arizona's Future measure will also help increase the value of trust land by managing growth and preserving some land for conservation efforts. It will create a planning system that includes cities and towns, so that local areas will be involved in the process as well. Any planning conflicts will be resolved through an arbitration process, so that plans may proceed as efficiently as possible. By restructuring the management of trust lands, the state can increase the amount of funding that can be raised for public education. Please vote your approval to quality education and sound state trust land management.
Phil Gordon, Mayor of Phoenix, Phoenix
Paid for by "Conserving Arizona's Future"

A Vote for a Sustainable Future Arizona is a rapidly growing state. Some of the most beautiful natural areas are in the path of urban development. Although community growth can be a good thing, it is important that we proceed in a more sustainable manner. The Conserving Arizona's Future initiative will help ensure that Arizona develops in a responsible and careful manner. This initiative would set aside 690,000 of state trust land for conservation purposes. The land would be split into permanent preserves, provisional preserves, and educational preserves. Over one-third of this land will be set aside for permanent preserves, which means that the land will be protected from development forever as soon as the ballot measure passes. Approximately one-half of the land will be turned into provisional preserves, which means that individuals may buy the land, but only if they agree to use the land for conservation purposes. The remainder of the land will be allocated for education reserves, which means the land will be transferred to universities for conservation and research management. Through this diverse approach, important natural resources in Arizona will be conserved in their natural state and managed through careful conservation and educational means. Help Arizona grow responsibly by voting YES on Conserving Arizona's Future.
Mayor Mary Manross, City of Scottsdale, Scottsdale
Paid for by "Conserving Arizona's Future"

On Behalf of the CAF Committee The Conserving Arizona's Future coalition is made up of more than 100 organizations and individuals representing thousands of Arizona citizens who worked hard to qualify this measure for the ballot. Over the last five years, leaders of these groups have worked to craft a measure we believe benefits important conservation AND education efforts in Arizona. This initiative conserves nearly 700,000 acres of natural areas and critical water supplies, manages growth by requiring cooperative planning with local communities, and protects a critical education funding stream that goes directly to our classrooms. We believe better planning, public oversight and conservation of important urban and rural lands will increase the value of the trust and improve the quality of life for all Arizonan's. This initiative achieves all those things. Eleven million acres of state trust and was granted to Arizona at statehood to be sold or leased for designated beneficiaries. There are thirteen public institutions, the largest one being our K-12 schools that benefit from the investments made off the sale or lease of these lands. We must take stewardship of that trust and of our future seriously. Arizona is a vast and beautiful state, but it is developing at a rapid rate. We can't afford uncontrolled and unplanned development that threatens that beauty, and we must safeguard our education funding in order to provide the best possible education for our children. The members of the coalition represented by the Nature Conservancy in Arizona, the Sonoran Institute, the Arizona Education Association, Arizona Public Service and Valley Partnership urge you to vote YES on Conserving Arizona's Future. We need to act now to conserve land, control development and protect education funding.
John H. Wright, III, Treasurer, Conserving Arizona's Future, President, Arizona Education Association, Phoenix
Patrick Graham, Chairman, Conserving Arizona's Future, Glendale
Paid for by "Conserving Arizona's Future"

Pro-Statement - AEA The Arizona Education Association represents over 35,000 teachers and support professionals statewide. For the past five years we have been engaged in a coalition effort of education, conservation and business interests to provide Arizona the opportunity to conserve and protect nearly 700,000 acres of open space; give communities the power to control growth; and protect funding for public education. Arizona's founding fathers had the foresight to set aside valuable land primarily to benefit children attending our public schools. Through our vote, we have the power to continue this legacy by ensuring a strong educational system, a healthy environment and responsible growth. This initiative is a win for all of Arizona. Conserving Arizona's Future is truly about safeguarding the natural beauty of our state and managing our assets responsibly to benefit our public schools. The people of Arizona have a chance to make a difference in our quality of life for generations to come. Vote YES on Conserving Arizona's Future. Our communities, our schools and our children depend upon your support.
John H. Wright, III, President, Arizona Education Association, Phoenix
Andrew Morrill, Vice President, Arizona Education Association, Chandler
Paid for by "Arizona Education Association"

Protecting the Needs of Our Children Your state fire fighters are committed to the well-being of our state's most precious commodity - our children. Conserving Arizona's Future is truly about protecting the needs of our children for generations to come. Arizona's founding fathers had the foresight to set aside valuable land to benefit children attending public schools. Through our vote, we have the power to continue this legacy by ensuring a strong educational system, a healthy environment and responsible growth. In addition to protecting 690,000 acres of conserved trust land, the Conserving Arizona's Future efforts will increase funding for our public education system. This funding will provide better resources for the drop-out prevention program, reduce class size and supplement teacher pay in order to attract the most qualified teachers for the benefit of our children. The protected trust lands will provide recreational opportunities for our families such as hiking, camping, hunting and fishing. This effort also protects land, water and air in Arizona's wildlife areas. Please vote YES for the Conserving Arizona's Future initiative. Our unique and captivating scenery will be preserved and additional funding for our schools will provide quality educational standards for students of all ages. Billy Shields, Chairman, United Phoenix Fire Fighters, Phoenix
John Teefy, Secretary, United Phoenix Fire Fighters, Phoenix
Paid for by "United Phoenix Firefighters"

Quality of Life Preservation The Phoenix Law Enforcement Association, representing your Phoenix Police Officers, urges your support for the Conserving Arizona's Future state trust land initiative. This initiative addresses quality of life issues for generations to come. The sale and leasing of State Trust Lands provides a significant funding source for our students, teachers and classrooms. Monies distributed from the Classroom Site Fund currently provide $12.40 per student. Voter approval of the "Conserving Arizona's Future" initiative will assist in increasing these classroom revenues at a greater rate and provide a stable and predictable funding source for years to come. Smaller classrooms, supplemental teacher pay and a strong drop-out prevention program are benefits of the Classroom Site Fund. Arizona families will be able to enjoy many recreational benefits such as camping and hiking in areas including Catalina State Park, Gold Canyon, Ironwood National Monument, Lake Pleasant, Homolovi Ruins State Park, Picacho Peak State Park, Burro Creek and the Grand Canyon Scenic Corridor. Further provisions in the "Conserving Arizona's Future" initiative ensures fair market value on trust lands, improves the bidding process and implements an arbitration process for quicker conflict resolution. Please vote YES for open space preservation and quality education. Vote YES for "Conserving Arizona's Future."
Jake Jacobsen, Chairman, Phoenix Law Enforcement Association, Scottsdale
Michelle Monaco, Vice President, Phoenix Law Enforcement Association, Peoria
Paid for by "Phoenix Law Enforcement Association"

Exceptional Education for Arizona's Children Passing the Conserving Arizona's Future initiative is important for education in Arizona. This measure alone provides the right balance between conserving Arizona's recreational and open spaces for all and generating funds for education as intended by the Arizona Constitution. While protecting 690,000 acres of trust lands, the measure would greatly benefit public education. Trust land controlled by the State of Arizona sold off to raise money for education. This initiative would set aside a sizeable amount of land to preserve for future generations to enjoy, but keep the majority of trust land available for sale. In addition, the measure would improve how the government handles the sale of trust land for education. By providing better planning and management of trust lands, Arizona will be able to maximize open space as well as funding for public schools. This additional money will provide crucial educational benefits to students. Money will be given to fund dropout prevention programs, reduce class size and supplement teacher pay so that we can attract the most qualified individuals for our schools. Previous voter-approved initiatives mandate that this money is to be used to supplement educational funds appropriated by the legislature, and cannot be used by the government for any other purpose. The benefits from this measure are to the environment and education. Both are important for future generations, which explains why so many diverse groups of Arizonans support this measure.
David P. Roberts, Teacher, Phoenix
Paid for by "Conserving Arizona's Future"

Teachers Support Conserving Arizona's Future At statehood, Arizona was granted over 9 million acres of State Trust Land. Our public schools are the primary beneficiaries of any funding obtained from the sale or lease of these state trust lands. Each year the State Land Trust generates tens of millions of dollars that is deposited directly into the Classroom Site Fund to supplement teacher pay, fund drop-out prevention programs, and help reduce class size. As teachers, we helped collect over 280,000 signatures from communities around the state because we believe in protecting this investment in our children's future and ensuring that some of Arizona's parks, natural areas, and water are protected for generations to come. The Conserving Arizona's Future ballot initiative will conserve and protect 690,000 acres of land, require state and local communities to cooperate in planning, improve management of the trust to enhance its value, and protect and guarantee education funding for our public schools. This initiative provides a win-win situation for our communities, our schools and our children. We have the opportunity to preserve our desert and mountain environments and increase essential classroom funding at the same time. We need to act now to conserve land, control development, and improve education funding. Vote yes to "Conserve Arizona's Future!"
Michael Gordy, Tucson Annie K. Crego, Flagstaff
Herbert N. Weil, III, Glendale Jayne Weagle, Phoenix
Frank Bing, Chandler Nancy Putman, Scottsdale
Nidia Lias, Chandler Michael Conway, Mesa
Judy Moy, Avondale Moira Greene, Tucson
David R. Wright, Holbrook
Robert Garcia, Phoenix
William R. Rhodes, Yuma
Sarah A. Rosén, Sierra Vista
Janie Hydrick, Chandler
Paid for by "Arizona Education Association"

Conserving Arizona's Future is supported by educators from all across our great state. We understand the importance of conserving our land and water, and making sure Arizona remains a beautiful state to raise our children and grandchildren. Education Support Professionals are school bus drivers, cafeteria workers, secretaries, technology assistants, teacher's aides and maintenance workers. We help support children every day in our public schools so they can get the quality education they deserve. That's why we support Conserving Arizona's Future. This initiative will conserve nearly 700,000 acres across our state and provide more funding for our schools. We can all be a part of a better future for our kids and our communities. Vote YES on Prop 106, Conserving Arizona's Future.
Andrea Haber, Tucson
Richard Berumer, Tempe
Michael L. Still, Glendale Debbie A. Montes, Marana
Paid for by "Arizona Education Association"

Valley Forward Association strongly supports "Conserving Arizona's Future", a critical state trust land reform package that will preserve our natural resources and increase funding for education. Our 37-year-old environmental public interest group focuses exclusively on the balance between economic growth and environmental quality, which is the cornerstone of "Conserving Arizona's Future." This important initiative was years in the making and involved input from a broad-based coalition of conservationists, educators and business leaders. If approved, it would: Conserve and protect some 690,000 acres of trust land for immediate or future protection from development; Require the State Land Department to cooperate with local communities for planning and conservation of state trust lands, and provide local authorities the power to limit and control development; Protect and guarantee an essential classroom funding stream, ensuring better schools for Arizona. Currently, the state has 9 million acres of trust land that it may someday sell to benefit education. The trust land derives from federal land that was given to Arizona at statehood, with the proviso that it be sold for the "highest and best use" to fund education. That has limited the auction of the land to those who can pay the most. Existing laws force municipalities and conservation groups to compete with deep-pocket developers for some of the state's most desirable remaining desert. "Conserving Arizona's Future" would allow voters to directly save some of the state's most environmentally significant lands - critical wildlife habitats, geographic formations and scenic vistas - while allowing the majority of trust land to remain available for sale, benefiting educational funding. Valley Forward urges your "YES" vote on this important measure. Let's make sure the land that now lies in the path of urban sprawl is preserved. Future generations are counting on us!
Joan Eisenhauer, 2006 Chair of the Board, Valley Forward,
Waddell Diane Brossart, President, Valley Forward, Scottsdale
Paid for by "Conserving Arizona's Future"

Conserving Arizona's Future Initiative - Pro Statement The Conserving Arizona's Future Initiative (CAFI) would increase revenue to public schools, while protecting some of Arizona's most scenic and environmentally important land for future generations. Arizona holds more than nine million acres of land in trust, primarily for the benefit of public schools. Yet the state does not receive an adequate stream of income from the land because it lacks the tools and resources to manage and market the land effectively. CAFI would improve the way state trust lands are managed by requiring that the lands be planned in conjunction with the land use plans of local governments. It would create a Board of Trustees, whose members would have substantial involvement in public education, with new powers and funding to manage the lands. At the same time, CAFI would protect approximately 694,000 acres of land trust land from development, something that is not currently permitted. Much of this land is located near state and national parks, monuments, and preserves. The legislature has put its own rival State Land Trust Reform referendum on the ballot. If passed this law would give the state legislature, instead of a Board of Trustees, the power over how much land is sold and/or set side for conservation. Initially, only 43,000 acres would be set aside now and no more than 400,000 could be set aside in the future. It would not improve the funding inadequacies of the State Land Department. The League of Women Voters of Arizona urges all citizens to vote for the Conserving Arizona's Future Initiative instead of the legislature's proposition. CAFI is more likely to ensure a steady flow of funding to our schools and to protect more of our most beautiful land.
Dr. Bonnie F. Saunders, President, League of Women Voters of Arizona, Surprise
Dr. Barbara Klein, 1st Vice President, League of Women Voters of Arizona, Scottsdale
Paid for by "League of Women Voters of Arizona"

Protect Arizona's Natural Beauty Arizonans statewide have the unique opportunity to preserve a network of important natural areas--precious forests, deserts, mountains and rivers--that will help secure our water future and be available to us for all time. For generations to come, Arizona families will enjoy hiking, camping and fishing in these beautiful surroundings. The Conserving Arizona's Future citizens initiative protects 694,000 acres of critical lands across our state--charismatic places like the McDowell Mountains and Phoenix Sonoran Preserve in Maricopa County, the Tortolita Mountains and Rincon Valley in Pima County, the Big Chino grasslands in Yavapai County, and the lands around some of our state's most important parks and natural areas such as Patagonia Lake State Park, Picacho Peak State Park, Superstition Vistas, Walnut Canyon National Monument and the Grand Canyon Scenic Corridor. The measure also takes an important step in securing our natural sources of water--the Verde, San Pedro and Little Colorado rivers. Conserving Arizona's Future provides for more effective management of state trust lands, allowing our communities to better plan for growth. Additionally, it increases the vital funding stream that flows into public school classrooms throughout the state. The health of our land and water is essential to the quality of life we enjoy in Arizona. Show your support for balancing the need to save our natural areas with the responsibility to continue the state trust land mission of educating our children. Join us in voting YES on the Conserving Arizona's Future initiative. Thank you for choosing conservation and education!
John Graham, Chair, Board of Trustees, The Nature Conservancy Arizona Chapter, Paradise Valley
Patrick Graham, Executive Director, The Nature Conservancy Arizona Chapter, Glendale
Paid for by "The Nature Conservancy"

Help protect Arizona's trails by voting YES on Proposition 106 Proposition 106 will reform state trust land management and will make sure that mountain biking continues in great places across the state. Arizona is full of ideal mountain biking opportunities and home to one of the strongest outdoor economies in the country. With unique terrain ranging from desert to loamy soil, we've got a lot to protect! Conserving Arizona's Future will protect our current opportunities plus enable us as a state to assure our outdoor wonderland will be in tact and available for future generations to pedal and play upon. Conserving Arizona's Future is crucial when considering the fate of Arizona's open space. Please vote YES on proposition 106. This is the only state trust land proposition on the ballot that deserves a YES vote.
Todd Sadow, Executive Director, Epic Rides, Tucson
Richard DeBernardis, Board Member, Epic Rides, Tucson
Paid for by "Epic Rides"

Help protect Arizona's Sonoran Desert and high desert grasslands by voting YES on Proposition 106 Proposition 106 will protect key areas identified in Pima County's Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan from future development, including areas within or adjacent to the following parks and other environmentally significant landscapes:
Catalina State Park
Saguaro National Park
Cienega Creek
Tumamoc Hill
Tortolita Mountain Park
Tucson Mountain Park
Ironwood Forest National Monument
San Pedro River
Picacho Peak
Rincon Valley
Patagonia Lake State Park
Tumacácori/Santa Cruz River area
Malpai ranching lands
Santa Rita Experimental Range
Kartchner Caverns State Park
and many more areas...
These are areas we enjoy for hiking, camping, biking, hunting, fishing, horse-back riding and bird-watching! Conserving Arizona's Future will require the Arizona State Land Department to plan cooperatively with Pima County and other jurisdictions -- respecting local rules and regulations to maintain the character and quality of our community. It also provides a working Board, made up of various interests (including conservation), to help manage our state lands in cooperation with the Director. If we do not pass this reform there is no way to protect even a single acre from development, and no way to influence how these lands get leased and sold. Please vote YES on proposition 106. This is the only state trust land proposition on the ballot that deserves a YES vote.
Michael Finkelstein, Executive Director, Center for Biological Diversity, Tucson Dr. Robin Silver, Board Chair, Center for Biological Diversity, Phoenix
Sue Clark, President, Pima Trails Association, Tucson
Don Scheer, Treasurer, Pima Trails Association, Tucson
Michelle Zimmerman, Executive Director, Rincon Institute, Tucson
Mary Elizabeth Pollard, Board President, Rincon Institute, Tucson
Katie Dusenberry, Board Vice President, Rincon Institute, Tucson
Matt Skroch, Executive Director, Sky Island Alliance, Tucson
Nancy Zierenberg, Executive Officer, Sky Island Alliance, Tucson
Luther Propst, Executive Director, Sonoran Institute, Tucson
Anna Price, Chair, Board of Directors, Sonoran Institute, Tucson
Sonja Macys, Executive Director, Tucson Audubon Society, Tucson
Christina McVie, Vice President and Conservation Chair, Board of Directors, Tucson Audubon Society, Tucson
Nancy R. Laney, Executive Director, Tucson Botanical Gardens, Tucson
Margaret Livingston, Ph.D., President, Board of Directors, Tucson Botanical Gardens, Tucson
Paid for by "Sonoran Institue"

Conserving Arizona's Future deserves a "YES" vote. Arizona is a magical state. Its rivers, deserts, forests, mountains, canyons and wildlife reflect our highest values. As citizens of the American West, we believe this natural beauty must be preserved and protected At the same time, we must acknowledge that Arizona is one of the country's fastest growing states. So our challenge is to find a way to balance the needs of our people and our mandate for environmental protection. Conserving Arizona's Future provides that reasonable and sensible balance. I want my children, grandchildren and future generations to enjoy the best of Arizona that all of us have come to know and love. Conserving Arizona's Future is the right plan to accomplish that goal. It has my full support. I hope you will join me in helping this worthy plan become a reality.
Robert E. Walkup, Mayor, City of Tucson, Tucson
Paid for by "Conserving Arizona's Future"

Please vote YES on Proposition 106 to Conserve the Best of Arizona for Future Generations! Proposition 106 is a thoroughly thought out and broadly supported initiative that will help to make sure that many of Arizona's most treasured and threatened lands are protected for future generations. In fact, by voting YES, you help to protect 690,000 acres of important state lands from development. In addition to conserving lands that we as Arizona citizens cherish, this initiative will protect and guarantee essential classroom funding for Arizona's schools. This initiative is supported by many of Arizona's conservation, education and business groups - because it's good for conservation and for education. Arizona is expected to more than triple its population by 2050 - with an expected population of 16 million people. Growth won't wait and we as citizens cannot afford to either. We must act immediately to protect lands critical to our air and water supply, wildlife habitat and outdoor enjoyment and recreation. As Arizona citizens, we all treasure the Phoenix Sonoran Preserve, the San Pedro River, Verde Headwaters, Grand Canyon scenic corridor, Superstition Mountains, Kartchner Caverns State Park and Walnut Canyon National Monument. By voting YES, you help to make sure that these and many other special areas are protected so that your grandchildren can experience the beautiful and diverse Arizona that you enjoy today. Let's Conserve Arizona's Future! Vote YES on Proposition 106!
Becky Daggett, Executive Director, Friends of Flagstaff's Future, Flagstaff
Susie Garretson, President, Friends of Flagstaff's Future, Flagstaff
Paid for by "Friends of Flagstaff's Future"

Vote YES on Proposition 106 to Protect Valuable Open Space Lands! Proposition 106, Conserving Arizona's Future, will protect 690,000 acres of prime state lands that must be preserved against future development, including lands along the Grand Canyon scenic corridor, lands neighboring Wupatki National Monument, Walnut Canyon National Monument, Observatory Mesa, Dry Lake and Rogers Lake. Conservation efforts are extremely important for our state. Many people move to Arizona each year and our cities are expanding at a very rapid pace. Although Arizona has plenty of room to grow, we need to maintain the high quality of life that attracts these new residents in the first place. There are 59 special areas identified statewide for protection. These areas include land adjacent to or within existing parks and preserves, such as the Picacho Mountains, Phoenix Sonoran Preserver, San Pedro River, Verde Headwaters, Grand Canyon scenic corridor, Kartchner Caverns State Park, Superstition Mountains, Lake Patigonia and Saguaro National Park. Conserving land is important, but conserving the right land is crucial. Conserving Arizona's Future will protect 690,000 acres of trust land that benefit air and water quality, wildlife, ecosystems and recreation. This conservation effort balances the best ecological practices with the recreational interests of Arizonans. Help support responsible conservation practices by voting YES for Conserving Arizona's Future. Vote YES on Proposition 106!
Nikolai Ramsey, Program Director, Grand Canyon Trust, Flagstaff
Darcy Allen, Director of Administration, Grand Canyon Trust, Flagstaff
Paid for by "Grand Canyon Trust"

Conserve and Protect Our State's Many Wonders
The Arizona Parks and Recreation Association strongly supports all provisions in the Conserving Arizona's Future initiative. Arizona is a state of truly diverse and beautiful landscapes that you truly have to see to believe! The red rocks of Sedona, the varied hues of the Painted Desert, the natural wonders of the Grand Canyon, Monument Valley and the Kartchner Caverns are almost indescribable. Voter passage of Conserving Arizona's Future will protect 59 special areas across the entire state so that Arizona families can continue to enjoy these breathtaking lands for hiking, biking, hunting, fishing and camping. These lands include Saguaro National Park, McDowell Mountains, Kartchner Caverns, Phoenix Mountains, Centennial Forest, San Pedro River, Verde Headwaters, Grand Canyon, the Picacho and Superstition Mountains and Lake Patagonia. APRA is a non-profit, professional organization designed to operate for the promotion, broadening and improvement of parks and recreation in Arizona; and to offer services which help members become the best parks and recreation services providers. Help conserve and protect the many wonders of our state. Please VOTE YES on the Conserve Arizona's Future initiative!
Ira M. Rubins, CAE, Executive Director, Arizona Parks & Recreation Association, Tempe
Ainsley Reeder, CPRP, 2006 President, Arizona Parks & Recreation Association, Oro Valley
Paid for by "Arizona Parks & Recreations Assoc."

Increase Teacher's Union Power by Supporting Prop. 106
Arizona has over 9 million acres of state trust land, land that is used to pay for Arizona schools, and yet we don't have any union representation of the land. Teachers have as much right to the land as the students, and that is why we must support Proposition 106. Proposition 106 would create a Board of Trustees to oversee the management and disbursement of the trust land, and would give the board the power to disperse the funds from the trust as they see fit. Another great facet to Proposition 106 is that it will allow the Teacher's Board to give the land away to conservationists and other non profit organizations, groups that will curtail unnecessary public access to the lands. The bottom line is unions and conservation groups need to increase their authority in the state, and the best way to do this is through Proposition 106. Please join me in voting YES on Proposition 106.
Chad Harper, Gilbert

Protect Teacher Unions and Developers by Voting Yes on Proposition 106
I urge every Arizonan to support Proposition 106. Proposition 106 will improve the management of our trust lands by creating a Board of Trustees, comprised primarily of teacher union members and school administrators, to manage the trust land. The best part about the board is that every member is appointed, so decisions can be made without fear of a possible backlash from the voting public. Plus, Proposition 106 contains a provision that allows developers to enter into special partnerships with the Teacher's Board to purchase large sections of trust land at below market value in order to create extensive new developments throughout the state. Not only will these agreements increase profits for the Teacher's Board and home builders, but will expedite development of Anthem-style master planned communities in both rural and urban Arizona. The problem with past state land initiatives is that teachers and developers were denied the power required to properly manage our trust lands. Fortunately, Proposition 106 does just that. Come November, please join me in supporting Proposition 106.
David L. Snyder, Mesa

The Arizona State Horsemen's Association feels "It's Up to Us Now" to support Proposition 106
Let's be clear about our state's future growth and quality of life. It is up to all of us to make the move now to conserve and develop our State Trust Lands in a responsible way for the 21st Century. Arizona won't reach its 100th birthday until 2012, and yet here we are, a relatively young, booming state still operating under aged mandates that choke the funding to our schools and allow rampaging development open access to some of our state's most valuable natural resources. Caring, concerned, and responsible Arizonans have worked many years to help us craft the planning tools we now need to help guide and manage our State Land Department. We all need to do the right things, now, to help protect and maximize our state's education funding and, at the same time, conserve our magnificent natural resources. Your support of "Conserving Arizona's Future" will make you part of the legacy that helped save Arizona's future. Nancy Monsour, Treasurer, Arizona State Horsemen's Assoc., Buckeye
Charles B. Lefkowitz, Vice President, Arizona State Horsemen's Assoc., Scottsdale
Linda Ann Slay, Secretary, Arizona State Horsemen's Assoc. Phoenix
Paid for by "ASHA-The Arizona State Horsemen's Assoc."

Audubon Arizona
The Right Balance: Preservation of Funding for Public Schools While Preserving and Protecting Our Wildlife and Recreational Opportunities
Arizonans have a chance to help protect our quality of life by voting for the Conserving Arizona's Future ballot measure. This measure would not only result in increased funding for public schools, but it would turn 690,000 acres of state trust land into permanent preserves protected from encroaching development. Right now we enjoy many recreational opportunities, such as camping, biking, picnicking, bird watching, horseback riding and hiking, on undeveloped State land. Residents can enjoy these activities in locations across the State, including the Cave Creek Recreation Area, Burro Creek, Catalina State Park, Coronado National Memorial, Gold Canyon, the Grand Canyon Scenic Corridor, Lake Pleasant Recreation Area, Lyman Lake State Park, Ironwood National Monument, Homolovi Ruins State Park, Picacho Peak State Park, and Saguaro National Park. These and other areas not only provide recreation but also habitat for wildlife. The Conserving Arizona's Future ballot measure would prevent development that would destroy the State land for both purposes. Plans for the protected trust land cover a diversity of ecological systems, from forests to grasslands to desert areas. These lands are important for the wildlife habitats of plants and animals, which would otherwise be endangered by the threat of future development. Conserving Arizona's Future will do just that--protect the land, water, air, plants and animals that are native to Arizona. Because Audubon's mission is to help protect and preserve our natural wildlife and their habitats, we endorse this initiative and urge you to vote YES. By doing so, you ensure that all Arizonans, both now and in the future, will be able to continue to enjoy a wide range of recreational opportunities and preserve the natural places that wildlife call home.
Ray Hunter, Chair, Board of Directors, Audubon Arizona, Phoenix
Sam Kathryn Campana, Vice President & Executive Director, Audubon Arizona, Scottsdale
Tice Supplee, Director of Bird Conservation, Audubon Arizona, Phoenix
Roger Ferland, Chair, Public Policy Committee, Audubon Arizona, Scottsdale
Paid for by "Audubon Arizona"

Vote YES on Conserving Arizona's Future to Preserve Our Natural Treasures
The Conserving Arizona's Future initiative will protect 690,000 acres of state trust lands ensuring that some of our natural treasures surrounding Arizona's parks and monuments will be preserved for the enjoyment of future generations. It will also increase cooperation between local communities and the State Land Department in planning for the disposition of state trust lands. A Board of Trustees will be created to ensure oversight of the management of these assets for the benefit of school children. The Conserving Arizona's Future initiative is the culmination of many years of work involving education, conservation and business leaders to develop (1) a comprehensive reform measure to manage Arizona's state trust lands; (2) provide for the protection of critical lands for habitat and open space and (3) ensure that the proceeds from the sale of state trust lands benefit Arizona's school children. State trust lands were granted to Arizona at statehood to benefit public schools through their sale or lease. As our communities continue to grow at such a rapid pace, our quality of life is thrown into jeopardy by haphazard, poorly planned development, and outdated land use policies. Arizona has changed a great deal since statehood, but our tools for managing state trust lands have not kept pace with our changing circumstances and high growth. We must do a better job of managing state trust lands and provide for the appropriate management of ecologically sensitive lands. The Conserving Arizona's Future initiative will accomplish these important goals. In reforming state trust land management, we must balance the needs of many stakeholders - communities and local governments, school children, development interests - and also protect Arizona's stunning landscapes, wildlife habitat, and scenic beauty for future generations. Conserving Arizona's Future does this - please vote YES.
Anne Graham Bergin, President, Arizona League of Conservation Voters, Tucson
Jessica Catlin, Secretary, Arizona League of Conservation Voters, Phoenix
Paid for by "Arizona League of Conservation Voters"

On behalf of nearly 600 businesses, organizations and municipalities who are members of Valley Partnership and employ tens of thousands of Arizonans, we encourage you to vote YES on Conserving Arizona's Future. There are approximately 73 million acres of land in Arizona. More than 9 million acres of it are State Trust land, including vast holdings in and around Metropolitan Phoenix, Tucson and Flagstaff. What happens with these lands is of critical importance to our future, particularly since their primary purpose is to generate income for public schools. Conserving Arizona's Future is a visionary measure that provides a framework for better management of these lands that balances the best interests of education, conservation, business and the economy. Its provisions include the following: Conservation of up to 700,000 acres of Arizona's signature landscapes and important natural areas. Means to generate significantly greater revenues for the Classroom Site Fund, which is used to increase teachers' salaries, reduce class sizes, and prevent drop-outs in Arizona's public schools; Modified planning processes and tools that dovetail with city and county planning, which will create more orderly growth and greater economic promise; and A citizen board to oversee critical decisions made about State Trust land; and Most important to note, however, is that the mandate on the Trustees and the Trust to generate maximum revenue for the schools and other beneficiaries is kept intact. Conserving Arizona's Future is an across-the-board "win" for every citizen of the State of Arizona because it is the product of five years of debate with stakeholders from every sector of the community. Please vote YES to ensure we do the right thing for our State.
Charley Freericks, Chairman of the Board, Scottsdale
Richard R. Hubbard, President & CEO, Phoenix
Paid for by "Valley Partnership"

Yes on 106
I support the Conserving Arizona's Future Initiative because it is in the best interests of the Citizens of the State of Arizona, The State Trust Lands, and the State Land Beneficiaries - Schools. This measure will preserve more open space and bring in more dollars for education in our schools. In addition, it addresses the need for obtaining rights of way for transportation routes, and establishes a Board of Trustees to approve major decisions in land use dictated by the proposed sale of State Trust Land. State Trust Land constitutes one-third of the total land in Pinal County. The very future of our county will be impacted by the how State Land is managed. This measure requires that the State Land Department follow the comprehensive plans of the counties and cities which have been developed in conjunction with citizen input. Also addressed in this initiative is the ability to preserve open spaces for our children and their children - future citizens of Arizona.
Sandie Smith, Pinal County Supervisor, District Two, Gold Canyon

Vote Yes For Our Future
Some of the most beautiful natural areas in Arizona are located on "State Trust Land" - land that was granted to our state by the federal government in 1910 with the intent that the majority of the monies from the sale or lease of these lands would produce revenue for our state-wide school system. While some monies for education are generated, the 1912 laws which govern the program are antiquated and do not allow the program to maximize the funds possible for the education system nor care properly for the health of these lands. They do not provide for the preservation of any of the more sensitive and ecologically critical state lands nor do they facilitate good planning which can result in smarter growth for Arizona. Conserving Arizona's Future will protect 690,000 acres of sensitive lands statewide, improve planning and management standards to ensure smarter growth with provisions for additional protected open space and increase income for our woefully underfunded school system. Some of the beautiful lands that would be preserved immediately include areas in the McDowell Mountains, the White Tank and Superstition Mountains, the Cave Creek Regional Park, the Phoenix Sonoran Preserve, Catalina State Park, the Grand Canyon Scenic Corridor and the headwaters of the Verde River. Many of these irreplaceable lands are in the direct path of urban growth and this is the last opportunity we have left to protect them. This initiative provides a win-win situation as voters are provided with the opportunity to preserve our desert and mountain environments, ensure better planning for appropriate growth and increase essential classroom funding at the same time. Please vote yes to "Conserve Arizona's Future!" Maureen Berkner, Desert Foothills Land Trust, New River
Michael Rigney, Executive Director, Desert Foothills Land Trust, Cave Creek
Melinda Gulick, Chairman, McDowell Sonoran Conservancy, Scottsdale Carla, Executive Director, McDowell Sonoran Conservancy, Scottsdale
Rosemary Shearer, Chairman, Superstition Area Land Trust, Apache Junction
Anne E. Coe, President, Superstition Area Land Trust, Apache Junction
Paid for by "McDowell Sonoran Land Trust"

Please join ranching families and others in support of Proposition 106
Arizona has changed significantly since the framers of the Arizona Constitution in 1912 structured the state trust land. The Arizona of 1912 was a place of spectacular landscapes, blue skies and just a few people. Today our landscapes are still largely intact, and our skies are still blue, but we are home to nearly six million people. Just as Arizona has evolved from a state dominated by cotton, copper and cattle to one of advanced biotechnology and knowledge, the way we manage and protect our state trust lands must also evolve. As many of you know, I grew up on a ranch and have a deep appreciation for the land. You care about keeping as much open space as you can to preserve our Arizona heritage. Conserving Arizona's Future is the only state trust land ballot measure that will give the state land department the ability to work with local jurisdictions to do planning in the urban area for conservation and development opportunities. Arizona has two things to lose - our heritage and our natural environment (the desert and mountains). What we want is to preserve our environment as well as protect our economic interests. It is all about a long-term vision for future generations. Please support Proposition 106.
Ann Day, Pima County Supervisor, Tucson

Please vote YES on the Conserving Arizona's Future ballot measure. Supported by both the education community and conservationists, this measure will result in increased funding for K-12 public education, and provide the opportunity to permanently protect over 690,000 acres of state trust land from development. Many of these lands are near or within state parks and encompass beautiful mountains and the diminished Sonoran desert, the most biologically diverse desert on the planet. Arizonans already enjoy these lands for a multitude of recreational opportunities such as camping, bicycling, hiking, bird-watching, hunting, fishing, and boating. These areas can be found around the entire state and in almost every county. In addition to recreation for all Arizonans and visitors from around the world, these lands also provide habitat for the wildlife that we enjoy through watching, hunting and fishing. These habitats are diverse, ranging from grasslands to riparian areas to deserts (all of which are some of the most imperiled habitats in Arizona) to forests. Conserving Arizona's Future requires the State Land Department to make plans for these lands in cooperation with the plans of cities, towns, and counties. Thus, the character of our communities and quality of life can be maintained as determined at the local level. Without this reform, Arizonans will be unable to influence how state trust lands are leased or sold, and they will be unable to protect any of these lands for future generations. Please vote YES on Conserving Arizona's Future, the only state trust land proposition worthy of a YES vote.
Karen W. O'Neil, President, Presoctt
Christina McVie, Secretary, Tucson
Paid for by "Arizona Audubon Council"

The Arizona Planning Association advocates for wise and balanced land use planning throughout the State and we ask you to vote yes on Proposition 106. Now is the time to reform the management of the Arizona State Trust Lands. This Proposition will help achieve reform by increasing revenues for the public schools and other beneficiaries while protecting nearly 694,000 acres of some of the most important natural areas in our state from development. Who could be against helping the future of Arizona? The education of our children and protection of our environment will only make Arizona stronger. Yet there is much more that will help Arizona in this initiative. It will strengthen the role of the Arizona State Lands Department and local government in deciding how these lands are developed. "Making great communities happen" is the motto of the American Planning Association (APA). As the Arizona chapter of APA, we believe this reform proposal will go a long way to make the great communities of Arizona happen! Building a great community begins at the local level. This Proposition includes legislation that will require Arizona State Trust Lands to be planned in conjunction with the county, city or town in which they are located pursuant to the local ordinances and regulations of the county, city or town (as long as the same applies to private lands). Now is the time. Please vote yes on Proposition 106.
Alan Stephenson, Vice President for Legislative Affairs, Arizona Planning Association, Phoenix
Jill Kusy, AICP, President-Elect, Arizona Planning Association, Scottsdale
Paid for by "Alan S. Stephenson"

Ballot Statement in support of the "Conserving Arizona's Future: Ballot Initiative
Where Will YOU Live, Work, and Play in 10 Years? Now it's up to you. We can let things continue just as they have been for over 90 years, or we can support "Conserving Arizona's Future" and take important steps to maximize our state's educational funding and, at the same time, dramatically improve the conservation of our state's magnificent natural resources. Your support of "Conserving Arizona's Future" will give the State Land Department the planning tools it needs to maximize the value of land to be auctioned for sale. This type of responsible planning helps our state grow without losing the natural resources that could have been conserved. If you enjoy the quality-of-life Arizona offers now, think about how your vote of support could help keep it that way in the future.
Diana Lee Brooks, Chairperson Phoenix Parks and Recreation Board, Phoenix
Flo Eckstein, Publisher, Jewish News of Greater Phoenix and Former Member and Chair of Phoenix Parks and Recreation Board, Phoenix
Paid for by "Diana L. Brooks"

VERDE VALLEY LAND PRESERVATION INSTITUTE URGES A "YES" VOTE
This Conserving Arizona's Future ballot issue holds the promise that Arizonan's are wise enough to want to savor and enjoy the things we treasure most about our State, the variety of recreation opportunities, the lovely places for solitude, the precious streams and rivers and the best education possible. Everyone benefits from this Initiative to allow conservation protection within State Trust Lands: -those who value recreation; -those who value clean air, water, and rivers; -those who value the scenic mountains and vistas;-those who love the scenic open spaces of our beautiful state. So much of our State Trust Land's 9.2 million acres is placed in areas worthy of all these designations. Never before have the voters had the opportunity to update the rules and guidelines for how the State Land Department functions so that the educational community that benefits from the Trust can realize more dollars than ever before. Beware of the opposing referendum put there by the home-builders and cattlemen. It is put there to confuse you, the voter. Vote "no" on it. Every acre proposed to be set aside for conservation via this referendum would have to be approved by the legislature who refused last year to pass a bill similar to "Conserving Az's Future". Their referendum would also permit leasing of land for grazing and agriculture without an auction; and would permit mining and grazing on preserve land that has been set aside for conservation protection. They will make it sound appealing, but it does not serve the citizens of this state. We should all vote yes on "Conserving Arizona's Future"!
Bob Rothrock, President, Cottonwood
Marybeth Carlile, Secretary, Sedona
Paid for by "Verde Valley Land Preservation Institute"

Yes on 106 (CAF)
State Trust Land is one of Arizona's most important assets. We hold about nine million acres in trust for the express purpose of earning money to benefit our public schools. Some of this land is extraordinarily valuable for development, and some of it is best left alone. Unfortunately, for the last thirty years, this land has too often been treated as a political football to be fought over, rather than a resource to be managed. This year's ballot unfortunately continues a heritage of divisive squabbling. Two measures on this ballot deal with trust land--Prop 106, "Conserving Arizona's Future"; and Prop 105, "HB 2045." I hope Arizonans will resist the instinct to vote "no" on both because they seem confusing. Proposition 106 is by far the better choice. We must do three important things with this land: make a lot of money for our schools; conserve important open space; release land to the market in a careful manner to achieve more sustainable development. Prop 106 was crafted by a broad based coalition of environmental, educational and business interests to achieve those goals. 106 is better than 105. First, it immediately preserves far more land as open space, and an additional open space can be identified and preserved by working with local communities. 105 requires individual actions by the legislature to conserve any land. Second, 106 creates a Board of Trustees to oversee the State Land Department, insulating it from political and legislative interference in management that has plagued past decisions. Third, 106 provides a dedicated funding source for the Department from the revenues it earns. As voters, we don't often get to make truly critical, long-term decisions about the future quality of life in our state. This year, we do. Vote yes on 106.
Grady Gammage, Jr., Phoenix

Help protect Arizona's treasures by voting YES on Proposition 106. For more than ten years the citizens of Arizona have worked diligently to protect open space and reform the antiquated procedures of disposition of state land. The Conserving Arizona's Future ballot initiative was successfully placed on the November ballot by a statewide coalition of volunteers who collected over 300,000 signatures from Arizona voters. Voter approval of the ballot initiative will update procedures for disposition of state lands. The new procedure will direct that decisions be expanded to the responsibility of a board of trustees rather than the current single responsibility of the Land Commissioner. This initiative also provides funding for the land department to better manage trust lands. Through the Initiative, citizens will join the effort to plan better for Arizona's growth, protect natural resources such as water, and balance growth impact so that it sustains our land and water. Diverse special areas across the state will be protected from development, including Badger Peak, Glassford Hill, Upper Chino Valley Grasslands and the Verde Headwaters all in Yavapai County. These natural treasures will be preserved for future generations to experience and enjoy. Please vote YES on proposition 106. This is the only state trust land proposition on the ballot that deserves a YES vote.
Thomas L. Pettit, Ph.D., President, Prescott
Ashley Fine, Treasurer, Prescott
Paid for by "Open Space Alliance"

Arguments "AGAINST" Proposition 106
Our forefathers provided Arizona with land to be held in trust to fund education for our public school children. These lands, and the proceeds from sold land, are constitutionally held in trust forever so that each and every public school child reaps the benefit. The Arizona School Boards Association opposes Conserving Arizona's Future, as it gives away 300,000 acres of land that could be sold to support our public school children and allows another 400,000 acres of land to waive the auction process, where best value can be obtained. Further, Conserving Arizona's Future puts in jeopardy the sale of state trust lands, and the additional dollars for Arizona classrooms they generate, with incomplete Constitutional language as to the process to which lands can be sold. The Arizona School Boards Association was at the table in collaboration with all parties to create trust land reform; Conserving Arizona's Future is not the product of these discussions. To change the Constitution that protects trust lands for the benefit of our public school children should only be done if that product enhances educational funding. Conserving Arizona's Future does not do this; there is a better way.
Rae Waters, President Arizona School Boards Association, Chandler
Panfilo H. Contreras, Executive Director, Arizona School Boards Association, Chandler
Paid for by "Arizona School Boards Association"

Proposition 106 is a lemon - appealing on the outside, but sour on the inside. Since when do Arizonans believe it is fair for representatives of one beneficiary of a multi-billion dollar trust to make all of the decisions for the other beneficiaries? This initiative places educations' bureaucracies and unions in charge of your state trust lands to benefit their own interests. Trusts are designed to be fair to all beneficiaries, with an independent trustee managing the assets. Please remember, these are not public lands, they are trust lands to be managed to their highest return. The definition of "conservation" in this initiative alone should make taxpayers pucker from the lawsuits that will sprout from its ambiguity. Recreation, hiking, camping, fishing, hunting and grazing uses may all be jeopardy on your trust lands. Arizonans recognize land grabs by now. This proposition is a lemon and there is no amount of sugar to make it go down easier for voters and taxpayers. Vote NO on 106 - it is a lemon. Vote YES on 105 - it represents balanced and fair reform of state trust lands.
Kevin Rogers, President, Arizona Farm Bureau, Mesa
James W. Klinker, Chief Administrative Officer, Arizona Farm Bureau, Mesa
Paid for by "Arizona Farm Bureau"

Don't Give Away our State Trust Lands
I am absolutely opposed to Proposition 106. Our state lands are one of our most precious resources, land that serves multiple uses and helps fund our public schools. Yet instead of protecting these lands, Proposition 106 would: Allow private groups to obtain the land without requiring payment for the land or its upkeep. Put in charge a politically appointed board with no real estate or land use experience to manage 9 million acres of state trust land. Cut funding for schools because of the reduction in land sales and values. Steal millions of dollars worth of land from our public universities, disabled hospitals, and the school for the deaf and blind. Proposition 106 is a direct assault on our public education system! Any changes made to the management of our state lands must focus on protecting the future of Arizona's children, not the needs of special interest groups. When you go to the polls, please vote no on Proposition 106.
Luke Wilcox, Gilbert
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 106
Proposition 106 is another special interest proposal to amend Arizona's Constitution. It contains some of the same bad ideas which have caused forest management to decline. Our forests are burning and we cannot properly manage them because of these same environmental ideas. Proposition 106 calls for us to give some School Trust Lands back to the federal government! Why would we want to give the federal government some of our School Lands? We need them to make money for our schools. Proposition 106 is a bad idea! Vote NO on Proposition 106.
Jean McGrath, Glendale
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

Why would anyone pay to maintain land that they cannot enjoy? I'm sick of special interests using taxpayer dollars for their pet projects! The authors of Proposition 106 think it is reasonable to let conservationists keep Arizona's citizens off of the land that these same taxpayers are paying to maintain. Anyone, any where can designate land for conservation and then Arizonans are denied access. Proposition 106 allows environmental groups to designate land for conservation. Proposition 106 never requires them to pay for maintaining the land. This means that the State Land Department pays to maintain the land with our hard earned tax dollars. Yet, there is nothing that requires them to allow us to use and enjoy the land as we do now. Vote NO on Proposition 106! It hurts Arizona's taxpayers!
Davey Kerr, Buckeye
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

Proposition 106 goes too far! Vote NO on Proposition 106! It goes too far by allowing for a politically appointed board with no experience to determine the value of State Trust Land. It will prohibit the construction of roads, trails, parking, and other recreational facilities on the Land, making it difficult for citizens to see the land. It will allow the monies that now go to our schools to be diverted by the government to any purpose they see fit. Proposition 106 is a big government initiative that is bad for Arizona's schools, students, and taxpayers. Vote NO on Proposition 106!
Robert Knorr, Maricopa
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

Proposition 106 diverts money from education to special interests. This proposition was drafted by interest groups intent on grabbing state trust land that doesn't belong to them. State trust land was intended to benefit future generations of Arizona students. But this dishonest proposition would divert millions from our schools as state land is handed over to so-called "conservation groups" or local governments without payment to the state permanent trust fund. Revenue from state lands goes directly to our classrooms and to increasing teacher pay. The amount grows every year - like a savings account for our kids. The Constitution guarantees that the trust fund receives the true value for this precious asset through public bidding. But if Proposition 106 passes, that revenue stream would be diminished as land is handed over to special interests without an open public process. Instead, the Constitutional guarantee is replaced by a politically-appointed Board of Trustees with the power to give special favors to well-connected applicants; like utility companies seeking a right-of-way without bidding, or local politicians seeking land without paying for it. What's more, the Board of Trustees can make deals with favored developers to provide state land for little or no money, in exchange for "profit sharing" after the land is developed. These groups even wrote a provision into Proposition 107 that would divert revenue from land sales or leases to cover bureaucratic expenses rather than deposit it in the permanent fund for schools.
Susan Krentz, Douglas
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

Proposition 106 hurts Arizona ranch families
Generations of ranch families have been careful stewards of state lands. In exchange for forage through leases on state land, ranchers pay fees directly to the state permanent fund to benefit Arizona schools. In addition to paying lease fees, ranchers must maintain, and preserve state land as a condition of these leases. Arizona ranchers are the biggest conservation program of all - caring for and improving millions of acres of state land for future generations. Proposition 106 will give so-called "conservation groups" the ability to designate land for conservation where ranchers have long operated. But unlike ranchers, these special interest groups won't take ownership of the land and won't be responsible for maintenance and upkeep: they would have the state trust pay for upkeep instead of sending money to our schools! And under their extreme definition of "conservation land" this dishonest amendment would prevent ranchers from making improvements that protect the land we lease and improve it for the future. Water sources used by wildlife and livestock, fencing, anti-erosion, trails, roads and everything else would be prohibited. We agree with conservation of trust land because we do it everyday. But this proposition is a land grab by special interests that will not care for the land and would stick others with the cost for their scheme. Please help preserve our ranching way of life by voting NO on Proposition 106
Bill Brake, President (Elgin), Arizona Cattle Growers Association, Scottsdale
Tom Chilton, Vice President (Arivaca), Arizona Cattle Growers Association, Tucson
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 106
Proposition 106 is an unfair and ill-conceived attempt to amend Arizona's Constitution. Our Constitution is a sacred document that should not be amended so that the State Land Department can enter into questionable land deals with big developers. It will create a big government board controlled by special interests with no experience in managing lands. Proposition 106 threatens the future of leases held by ranching families, it removes the opportunity for ranch families to improve State Lands and threatens the maintenance and management of these lands in rural Arizona. Vote NO on Proposition 106.
Bill McGibbon, Rancher, Green Valley
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 106
Proposition 106 is bad for rural Arizona. It ignores the needs of our rural counties and their citizens. It will hurt our schools, teachers and land planning efforts. These are our State Lands and we should not let special interest groups amend our Constitution in a way that hurts schools and rural Arizona. Some of these special interest groups have used the same tricks to stop activities in our forests. These same methods they want to apply to our State Lands. Our forests are burning and we do not need the same to happen to our State Lands. We should not allow special interest groups to use money and buy their way to a Constitutional amendment. Vote NO on Proposition 106.
J.R. DeSpain, Joseph City
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 106
Proposition 106 is bad for our schools, teachers and rural Arizona! It is another big government land grab by special interest groups in Arizona. Voters need to be very careful about how we amend the Constitution. Proposition 106 contains 5 pages of Constitutional amendments that were drafted in secret by special interest groups. We should reject special interest groups when they try to amend our Constitution. Proposition 106 proposes massive changes to our Constitution by creating a government appointed board that will be ripe for political cronyism, allows these special interest appointees to raid funds that should go to teacher salaries and schools, and lets special interest groups designate State lands for their own purposes. Vote NO on Proposition 106.
Gail Griffin, Sierra Vista
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 106
As a career and technical education teacher and program director I know that Proposition 106 will hurt our schools, teacher salaries and the children we are preparing for tomorrow's work force. It will severely diminish the earnings of our School Trust Fund - a fund that our Constitution set up for our children, schools and other beneficiaries. Proposition 106 calls for non-monetary compensation for our School Lands! Non-monetary means - no money - shouldn't we receive money for the payment on our school lands if special interest groups want it? Proposition 106 states that the Federal Government can get some of our school lands for free - doesn't the Federal Government have enough money to pay for our school lands? Protect our schools make special interest groups and the Federal Government pay for our school lands. Vote NO on Proposition 106.
Arlene McLaughlin, Palo Verde
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 106
Proposition 106 is bad for our schools, teacher salaries and the future of our State School Lands. That's why I as a school board member and the Arizona School Boards Association opposes it. It is a special interest land grab at some of our school trust lands. It proposes to amend our Constitution allowing for risky land deals with speculators, it proposes to create a government appointed board made up of special interests and it proposes to allow those special interests to raid a portion of our School Trust Fund monies. Proposition 106 is a bad idea! Vote NO on Proposition 106. Andrew Groseta, Cottonwood
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

Vote NO on "Conserve Arizona's Future." It is bad for our Schools! The State Trust Lands are essentially real estate holdings, held in trust, that belong to our Arizona Public Schools. Our children today and in the future deserve to "inherit" what is rightfully theirs through the value of this trust, which was set up for them by our forefathers. The land is not "public" nor is it "protected open space" as some would have you believe. The proceeds from the sale of the land directly benefit schools. That is the sole purpose of these land holdings. This initiative, created by a handful of people behind closed doors, seeks to undermine the value of the trust by taking away the sales-price protections currently in our Arizona Constitution. Our forefathers recognized the value of a solid education and intentionally designed the State Trust Land policies to reap the greatest profit for the school children. The initiative takes away those protections and puts decisions in the hands of a few unelected and unaccountable folks. Do you know who sits on the various boards in the state that are appointed to their positions? These people will not even go through an election process to keep them accountable to you. They will be able to carry out their agenda unnoticed. This allows them to enter into secret agreements with developers, which can't be a good idea. Hunters and ranchers will be hurt by this initiative! Land that is currently available to ranchers and hunters could become off limits. Also, camping and hiking activities may be cut off. Construction of trails, parking, roads and other facilities that our citizens enjoy could come to a halt if this passes. Please vote "NO" on this initiative. It is bad for our schools and for our state.
State Representative Pamela Gorman, Anthem
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

Argument Against Proposition 106
Proposition 106 is bad for Arizona's schools! It allows for a politically appointed Board of Trustees with no real estate or development experience to determine how to maximize the value of the State Trust Land while also allowing the government to divert the monies that now go into our school system to any purpose they see fit. This diversion of money will cause school programs to be cut due to lower revenues. Proposition 106 creates more big government and lets private special interest groups designate lands for conservation without paying for the land or its upkeep. Proposition 106 will diminish the value of the State Trust Land and be detrimental to our schools. Vote NO on Proposition 106 - it is bad for teachers, students, and schools
Rebecca Hardesty, Teacher, Tucson
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 106
Proposition 106 will hurt rural Arizona's ranching families. It is an unfair measure which will prohibit us from enhancing improvements on these State School Lease lands. Many of the same special interest groups that have stopped management efforts on our forests want to do the same with our State School Lands. Creating a government appointed board, raiding funds that should go to teacher salaries and schools, letting special interest groups designate State lands and allowing risky joint venture deals with land speculators are all bad ideas! Vote NO on Proposition 106.
Senator Jake Flake, Snowflake Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

The cornerstone of any republic is accountability. I encourage all Arizonans to reject Proposition 106 because it takes accountability in state land sales away from the executive and legislative branches and gives it to an unelected board which never has to answer to the voters of this state. Much of our funding for education in Arizona comes from the sale of state land. If there is a problem or a scandal as a result of a land sale shouldn't the people of Arizona be able to oppose those responsible with their vote? This proposition takes all of that away and gives it to a group of people who do not have to have any experience in trust management, land use or even conservation. Putting fiduciary responsibility for our children's future into the hands of those who have no experience or accountability is one reason why school boards across Arizona oppose this measure. The board it creates has the power to siphon off millions of dollars from the education communities revenues to fund this new bureaucracy for the State Land Department. And the initiative states, that if they run short on revenues they can increase the amount of money they get from the sale or lease of state lands so that they never run short of money regardless of what it is used for. A large bureaucracy, enormous power and millions of dollars with no accountability puts the land we hold in trust for our children's future at risk. Please join me in voting NO on another failed government program. Vote No on Prop 106.
Jonathan Paton, State Representative, Legislative District 30, Tucson
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

Arizona ranches protect open space. Ranchers own and maintain the vast majority of water sources wildlife depend upon. Ranchers kept vast numbers of wildlife alive during this extreme drought. Proposition 106 eliminates existing provisions for grazing lease renewals. Without grazing leases, private ranch lands will be subdivided. Wildlife will die cruelly of thirst. Further, Proposition 106 allows development in the core habitat of the waning Silverbell Desert Bighorn Sheep herd while squeezing developers out of poorer wildlife habitats. Vote NO on Proposition 106.
Cindy Coping, Malpais Ranch, Silverbell Mountains, Director for Pima County, Arizona Cattle Growers Association, Tucson
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

Proposition 106 is another bad idea that goes to far. It treats my family unfairly. It will freeze the State Land we have cared for and leased for decades. It will damage my family's ability to manage these State Lands by not allowing us to enhance the improvements for water and fencing. Proposititon 106 will allow special interest groups to designate State Lands for their own purposes, it will create a politically appointed board, dominated by special interest groups with no citizen oversight, it will allow monies that would normally go to our schools to be diverted by the government and it will allow private special interest groups to designate State Trust Lands for their own purposes while ignoring those of us who work and live in rural Arizona - Proposition 106 is a bad idea! Vote NO on Proposition 106.
Steve Pierce, Prescott Joan Pierce, Prescott
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

Proposition 106 is another idea that special interest groups want to use to designate State Lands for their own purposes. Arizona's urban areas have become home to many new comers from around the United States. They have no concept of the issue of State Lands and how the proposition will affect taxes for Arizonans as well as leaving rural communities holding the bag. This measure will create a politically appointed Board that will have no experience at managing land and will allow no oversight by Arizona citizens. We do not need special interest groups raiding a portion of the Trust Fund revenues. Vote NO on Proposition 106.
Janice Bryson, Arizona State Cowbells, Buckeye
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

We need better planning of state trust land, not Proposition 106
One thing we all agree on is that the needs of our schools, the need for conservation of sensitive state lands, and the needs of Arizonans for housing and jobs must be balanced. For over two years, a coalition of educators, planners, conservationists and public officials met to seek such a balance. Together, we sought to answer big questions about state lands: Which land is right for conservation and which land is suitable for development? How should it be preserved and how can public access be guaranteed? How can we conserve this land and still assure that our schools receive the true value for it? How can we coordinate state lands with local community plans? How can we plan for future land use? What about necessary infrastructure like roads, water, schools and utilities? All of these questions have answers that make sense. Unfortunately, the authors of Proposition 106 walked away from these discussions and sought to force their more extreme views on Arizona. The result would be an unprecedented raid on assets belonging to our schools, a politicized land planning process, and a clever scheme to frustrate good planning for the future. Proposition 106 is a one-sided scheme written by a small group of people with their own narrow agenda. Arizonans for Responsible Planning urges you to vote NO. It goes too far.
Kim Owens, Chairman, Goodyear
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 106
Proposition 106 contains massive constitutional amendments which are unfair to Arizona's ranching families. These ill-conceived constitutional amendments will create a big government board controlled by special interests with no experience in managing lands. The Board does not have any citizen oversight to protect our School Trust Lands from risky land deals and special interest influence. Proposition 106 threatens ranching leases, removes the opportunity for ranch families to improve State Lands and threatens the maintenance and management of these lands in rural Arizona. Say NO on Proposition 106.
Dwayne Dobson, Chandler
Paid for by "Arizonans for Responsible Planning"

As a teacher I know that Proposition 106 is bad for our schools and teacher salaries. As a sportsman I know that Proposition 106 hurts my ability to hunt & fish on State Trust Lands. It is just bad! Proposition 106 proposes massive changes to our Constitution and is full of bad ideas. It is a bad idea to let special interest groups designate State School Lands, it is a bad idea to let special interest groups take monies away from our School Trust Fund for their pet projects, it is a bad idea to let the Land Department do risky land deals with speculators, it is a bad idea to give a government appointed board constitutional authority to determine the value of our State School Lands - it is just bad! Proposition 106 is a bad idea - Vote NO!
Dan Bauer, Buckeye

Proposition 106 is another bad idea that goes to far. We are all for setting aside State Trust Lands for multiple use management. However, history has shown that "preservation" of public lands tends to exclude motorized recreation. Many people, including many senior citizens and those who are otherwise unable to walk great distances, use low impact motorized vehicles on State Trust Lands for sightseeing. As outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy Arizona's wide open spaces we oppose Proposition 106 because it fails to protect public access to open space, it is a bad deal for recreationists in general and would unfairly penalize our schools. It is another one-sided maneuver by environmentalists to remove human uses on our State Trust Lands. Proposition 106 will have many unintended consequences. It will jeopardize our ability to recreate and hunt on hundreds of thousands of acres State Trust Lands. Proposition 106 will allow special interests groups to designate State Trust Lands off limits to currently allowed uses. These are Arizona's School Trust Lands - not the dominion of special interests groups like the Sierra Club, Wildlands Project and Center for Biological Diversity, all of whom would strive to dominate the Trustee Board that would be created by this Proposition, to the detriment of the recreating public. Vote NO on Proposition 106.
Sanford B. Cohen, Trails Enthusiast, Prescott

Conserving Arizona's Future is a Bureaucratic Nightmare There is a time tested proverb that one would be wise to use when considering the Conserving Arizona's Future Initiative. It is "Don't judge a book by its cover" - or in this case - 'Don't judge an Initiative by its name." This Conserving Arizona's Future Initiative does everything but look out for the interests of you and I. Currently the State Land Department is entrusted with disposing of the trust land in a manner that is best for the State of Arizona. But here is a short list of why this Initiative should be renamed. When bureaucrats in the State Land Department are free to use revenue from the sale of trust land for any purpose they see fit - that worries me. When ranchers can't improve the land they lease for their cattle by putting up fences and water systems - something is wrong. When bureaucrats in the State Land Department are allowed to use revenue from the sale of trust land for any purpose they see fit - that smells of favoritism. When roads, trails, parking and other facilities are prohibited from being built on State Trust Land so that we can enjoy them to their fullest - that smacks of government 'overstep'. Arizona, please join me in voting against this initiative - we can do better.
Doug Clark, Anthem

As a school teacher and a registered Democrat who supports Governor Napolitano I adamantly oppose Proposition 106. Proposition 106 will hurt education, our schools and teacher salaries. It will severely diminish the earnings of our School Trust Fund - a fund that our Constitution set up for our children, schools and other beneficiaries. If special interest groups want our school land they should pay for it... if special interest groups want to take monies from our Trust Fund for their own benefit they should be stopped... if land speculators want to make risky deals with our land we should tell them no! We don't need to amend our Constitution in order to conserve State School Lands - we can do that now. Protect teacher salaries - Vote NO on Proposition 106.
Jennie (Gina) Ragsdale, Buckeye

Proposition 106 is an Insult to Arizona Voters
It seems like every time we go to the polls, there is some new group trying to tinker with how Arizona's state trust lands are managed. Under our current system, the state trust provides ranchers with land to graze, citizens with land to visit and enjoy, and public schools with a permanent and increasing revenue source. The system appears to work, yet now we have Proposition 106, which would prevent improvements from being made to the land (such as trails, ramada's, and campsites), would prevent people from accessing the land and enjoying our states beauty, and would reduce revenues to our public schools. On top of this, Proposition 106 is complicated, convoluted, and will likely tie our court system up in litigation for decades, undoubtedly costing taxpayers millions. Arizona voters need to continue to do what they have done the last ten years to every other state land reform proposal and vote NO on proposition 106.
Nate Porter, Chandler

Arizonan's must oppose Proposition 106
It's perfectly clear that the environmentalist were up to their old tricks again when they drafted Proposition 106. Giving away 700,000 valuable acres without any payment to our public schools? What a rip-off! Also, once this land is set aside, who exactly is going to take care of it? No where in Proposition 106 does it require that special interest groups actually take care of the land after they receive it. Taxpayers shouldn't be required to pay to maintain lands that special interests groups decide to have set aside. State lands should be paid for like any other piece of land, and shouldn't be stolen from the school children. Everyone needs to Vote No on this bad idea.
Jayson Clausen, Gilbert

Proposition 106 is a give away to Developers
Arizona has over 10 million acres of state trust lands, yet Proposition 106 is only setting aside 700,000 acres? Every day our wildlife is being put at risk by the never ending encroachment of wildcat development. We need a solution that will stop the growth and protect our fragile water supply. Instead, Conserve Arizona's Future will inexplicably allow the state to sell our most precious open space to developers and builders at below market value! If this was really about conserving Arizona's future, we wouldn't be giving land away to fat cat developers. Proposition 106 is a deal where only the rich win and Arizona loses. When going to the polls, vote no on Proposition 106.
Josh Stockton, Gilbert

The Arizona Tax Research Association (ATRA) opposes Proposition 106. In an effort to set aside certain lands in the state land trust, as well as dramatically change the current management of our state land trust, this initiative implements two policies which ATRA opposes. Transfer of major public policy power to an appointed board
In an effort to dramatically change the current management structure of the state land trust, Proposition 106 creates a seven member Board of Trustees. These individuals, who would be appointed by the Governor, would be given sweeping authority over the 9.3 million acres of state land trust, as well as the distribution of lands in the Conservation Reserve. In addition, this appointed Board would have the authority to transfer state land trust monies primarily used for the benefit of public schools to a new Trust Land Management Fund. Earmarking Revenue Outside The Budgeting Process For decades, ATRA has expressed concerns about earmarking revenues outside the appropriations process through what is commonly referred to as "ballot-box budgeting." Proposition 106 is another in a long line of initiatives that have been placed before Arizona voters in an attempt to guarantee funding for a program, agency, or special interest group. Clearly, every group that receives annual State General fund appropriations would opt to receive guaranteed funding from sources other than the state General Fund. However, earmarking revenue and creating dedicated funding mechanisms does significant damage to the state's ability to do comprehensive budgeting and handcuffs state policymakers' ability to readjust budget priorities over time. ATRA encourages Arizona voters to reject a proposal that would give an appointed board sweeping powers over the state land trust, as well as the authority to transfer monies from the permanent fund.
Gretchen Kitchel, ATRA Chairman, Scottsdale
Kevin McCarthy, President, Gilbert
Paid for by "Arizona Tax Research Association"

Proposition 106 does nothing to protect Arizona's Wildlife
Look carefully at Proposition 106 and you'll see that wildlife was given little to no consideration in its drafting. In fact wildlife is mentioned one time, in the definition of conservation. But don't be fooled, their definition of conservation says that lands will be "preserved" not "conserved". As the first true conservationists, sportsmen and women all know the difference between preservation and conservation. We understand the difference between maintaining and enhancing wildlife habitat as compared to merely setting land aside in order to inhibit its use by the general public. Sportsmen and women also know the importance of protecting Wildlife Migration Corridors to ensure the safe passage of our wildlife from one area to another. Proposition 106 contains no provision for the maintenance of critical wildlife migration corridors. Wildlife corridors are not even mentioned, though there is a lot of verbiage about preserving land for certain uses. There is nothing about providing safe passage for Arizona's wildlife by giving priority to wildlife when conservation lands are designated. If wildlife conservation was a true consideration when Proposition 106 was being drafted, Arizona's Game & Fish Department and sportsmen would have been invited to the table for their knowledge and commitment to conserving Arizona's wildlife, but they were not. Don't be fooled, Proposition 106 is more about setting land aside for the sake of preservation, not for the benefit of Arizona's wildlife.
Pete Cimellaro, Executive Director, Arizona Sportsmen for Wildlife, Phoenix
Floyd F. Green, Secrtary/Treasurer, Arizona Sportsmen for Wildlife, Phoenix
Paid for by "Arizona Sportsmen for Wildlife"

BALLOT FORMAT
PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION BY INITIATIVE PETITION
OFFICIAL TITLE
AN INITIATIVE MEASURE
PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA; AMENDING ARTICLE X, SECTIONS 1, 3, AND 4, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA; AMENDING ARTICLE X, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA, BY ADDING SECTIONS 1.1, 1.2, 7.1 AND 12; RELATING TO STATE LANDS.
DESCRIPTIVE TITLE
SETS ASIDE 694,000 ACRES OF STATE TRUST LAND IN CONSERVATION RESERVE; ALLOWS CONVEYANCE OF CONSERVATION LAND AND RIGHTS-OF-WAY WITHOUT AUCTION AND CERTAIN LAND WITHOUT COMPENSATION; ESTABLISHES BOARD TO PLAN AND DISPOSE; ALLOWS LAND TRANSFER BEFORE REVENUE SHARING PAYMENT AND USE OF SOME REVENUES FOR ADMINISTRATION; REQUIRES STATE AND LOCAL COORDINATION.
A "yes" vote shall have the effect of setting aside 694,000 acres of state trust land for conservation, permitting the conveyance of Educational and Permanent Reserve lands without auction or compensation, permitting the conveyance of Provisional Reserve lands without auction, requiring local coordination of trust land planning in conjunction with the state, establishing a board of trustees to manage and dispose of state trust land, allowing public rights-of-way over trust land without auction at appraised value, allowing transfer of trust land before revenue-sharing payment and use of some revenues for trust administration. YES
A "no" vote shall have the effect of retaining the current law regarding the sale and use of state trust land. NO

The Ballot Format displayed in HTML reflects only the text of the Ballot Proposition and does not reflect how it will appear on the General Election Ballot. Spelling, grammar, and punctuation were reproduced as submitted in the "for" and "against" arguments. This text only version of the proposition guide may not include striking, underlining, emphasis and bolding of words in the proposition language, or in "for" or "against" arguments.

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JANICE K. BREWER
Arizona Secretary of State

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