Arizona Secretary of State - Ken Bennett


 
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Proposition 111

PROPOSITION 111

OFFICIAL TITLE

SENATE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION 1013

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA; AMENDING ARTICLE V, SECTION 1, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA, AS AMENDED BY A 1992 INITIATIVE MEASURE DESIGNATED AS BALLOT PROPOSITION 107; REPEALING ARTICLE V, SECTION 1, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA, AS AMENDED BY 1991 HOUSE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION 2001 DESIGNATED AS BALLOT PROPOSITION 100; AMENDING ARTICLE V, SECTIONS 6 AND 9, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA; AMENDING ARTICLE V, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA, BY ADDING SECTION 13; RELATING TO THE EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT.

TEXT OF PROPOSED AMENDMENT

Be it resolved by the Senate of the State of Arizona, the House of Representatives concurring:

1. Article V, section 1, Constitution of Arizona, as amended by a 1992 initiative measure designated as ballot proposition 107, is proposed to be amended as follows if approved by the voters and on proclamation of the Governor:

1. Term limits on executive department and state officers; term lengths; election; residence and office at seat of government; duties

Section 1. A. The executive department shall consist of the governor, secretary of state LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, state treasurer, attorney general , and superintendent of public instruction, each of whom shall hold office for a term of four years beginning on the first Monday of January, 1971 next after the regular general election in 1970. No member of the executive department shall hold that office for more than two consecutive terms. This limitation on the number of terms of consecutive service shall apply to terms of office beginning on or after January 1, 1993. No member of the executive department after serving the maximum number of terms, which shall include any part of a term served, may serve in the same office until out of office for no less than one full term.

B. The person having a majority of the votes cast for the office voted for shall be elected. If no person receives a majority of the votes cast for the office, a second election shall be held as prescribed by law between the persons receiving the highest and second highest number of votes cast for the office. The person receiving the highest number of votes at the second election for the office is elected, but If the two OR MORE persons have an equal number of votes for the office AND THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF VOTES FOR THE OFFICE, the two houses of the legislature at its next regular session shall elect forthwith, by joint ballot, one of such persons for said office.

C. DURING THE PRIMARY ELECTION, CANDIDATES FOR THE OFFICE OF GOVERNOR SHALL RUN FOR THAT OFFICE SEPARATELY FROM ANY CANDIDATES FOR THE OFFICE OF LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR. ON COMPLETION OF THE PRIMARY ELECTION, EACH NOMINEE FOR THE OFFICE OF GOVERNOR SHALL RUN ON A TICKET AS A JOINT CANDIDATE IN THE GENERAL ELECTION WITH THE NOMINEE FOR THE OFFICE OF LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR FROM THE SAME POLITICAL PARTY AS THE NOMINEE FOR GOVERNOR. AT THE GENERAL ELECTION, A SINGLE VOTE FOR A NOMINEE FOR GOVERNOR SHALL CONSTITUTE A VOTE FOR THAT NOMINEE'S TICKET, INCLUDING THE NOMINEE FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR. FOR ANY WINNING CANDIDATE FOR GOVERNOR AT THE GENERAL ELECTION, THAT WINNING CANDIDATE'S JOINT CANDIDATE FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR IS THE WINNING CANDIDATE FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR.

C. D. The officers of the executive department during their terms of office shall reside at the seat of government where they shall keep their offices and the public records, books , and papers. They shall perform such duties as are prescribed by the constitution and as may be provided by law.

2. Article V, section 1, Constitution of Arizona, as amended by 1991 house concurrent resolution 2001 designated as ballot proposition 100, is proposed to be repealed as follows if approved by the voters and on proclamation of the Governor:

Article V, section 1, Constitution of Arizona, as amended by 1991 house concurrent resolution 2001 designated as ballot proposition 100, relating to the executive department, is repealed.

3. Article V, section 6, Constitution of Arizona, is proposed to be amended as follows if approved by the voters and on proclamation of the Governor:

6. Death, resignation, removal or disability of governor; succession to office; impeachment, absence from state or temporary disability

Section 6. A. In the event of the death of the governor, or his THE GOVERNOR'S resignation, removal from office , or permanent disability to discharge the duties of the office, the secretary of state LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, if holding by election, shall succeed to the office of governor until his A successor shall be elected and shall qualify. If the secretary of state LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR be holding otherwise than by election, or shall fail to qualify as governor, the attorney general, the state treasurer , or the superintendent of public instruction, if holding by election, shall, in the order named, succeed to the office of governor UNTIL A SUCCESSOR IS ELECTED AND QUALIFIES.

B. The taking of the oath of office as governor by any person specified in this section shall constitute resignation from the office by virtue of the holding of which he THE PERSON qualifies as governor. Any successor to the office shall become governor in fact and entitled to all of the emoluments, powers and duties of governor upon taking the oath of office.

C. In the event of the impeachment of the governor, his THE GOVERNOR'S absence from the state , or other temporary disability to discharge the duties of the office, the powers and duties of the office of governor shall devolve upon the same person as in case of vacancy, but only until the disability ceases.

4. Article V, section 9, Constitution of Arizona, is proposed to be amended as follows if approved by the voters and on proclamation of the Governor:

9. Powers and duties of state officers

Section 9. The powers and duties of secretary of state LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, state treasurer, attorney-general, ATTORNEY GENERAL and superintendent of public instruction shall be as prescribed by law.

5. Article V, Constitution of Arizona, is proposed to be amended by adding section 13 as follows if approved by the voters and on proclamation of the Governor:

13. Lieutenant governor assuming secretary of state duties

SECTION 13. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER LAW, THE DUTIES OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE AS SPECIFICALLY PROVIDED FOR IN THIS CONSTITUTION AND AS OTHERWISE PRESCRIBED BY LAW SHALL BE ASSUMED BY THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR.

6. Applicability

This proposition applies and the lieutenant governor assumes the title and duties of the secretary of state beginning with the term of office that starts in 2015.

7. The Secretary of State shall submit this proposition to the voters at the next general election as provided by article XXI, Constitution of Arizona.

ANALYSIS BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

Proposition 111 would amend the Arizona Constitution to rename the office of secretary of state as the office of lieutenant governor, beginning with the term of office that starts in 2015. The lieutenant governor elected in the November 2014 general election would assume all of the duties currently performed by the secretary of state, including being first in the line of succession to replace a governor unable to serve.

The proposition provides that during the primary election, candidates for the office of lieutenant governor would run separately from candidates for the office of governor. The nominees selected at the primary election for the office of governor and lieutenant governor from the same political party would then run on a single ticket in the general election. At the general election, voters would cast a single vote for a candidate for governor, and that vote would constitute a vote for the ticket, including the candidate for lieutenant governor.

Proposition 111 also would make a technical change by consolidating two overlapping versions of Article V, section 1 of the Arizona Constitution and then repealing one of the overlapping versions.

 

ARGUMENTS "FOR" PROPOSITION 111

Vote Yes on Proposition 111 and Elect a Lieutenant Governor for Arizona

As Arizona approaches its centennial year, Greater Phoenix Leadership joined with Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and the O'Connor House Project to support Government for Arizona's 2nd Century, which brought citizens together from across the State to discuss problems facing Arizona and find solutions to improve our government. Their recommendations represent the views of a diverse, bi-partisan group of people from across the State. Electing a Lieutenant Governor for Arizona was among the most popular of their reform ideas.

Governor Jan Brewer once said she should be the poster child for a campaign to create a Lieutenant Governor, having been the fifth Arizona Governor to ascend from Secretary of State. Forty-five states in America have a Lieutenant Governor, and "truth in advertising" is the primary objective of this constitutional change. Arizona voters should have a clear understanding of our State executive's line of succession.

As strong supporters of the reforms that came out of Government for Arizona's 2nd Century, Greater Phoenix Leadership urges you to vote yes on Proposition 111 and let Arizona voters elect a Lieutenant Governor.

Thomas R. Franz, President, Greater Phoenix Leadership, Phoenix

Lisa A. Atkins, Vice President, Greater Phoenix Leadership, Litchfield Park

Paid for by Greater Phoenix Leadership

Vote Yes on Proposition 111

As members of the Board of the O'Connor House, we are delighted to support Proposition 111, which would enable the voters of Arizona to elect a Lt. Governor. This idea was one of several government reform measures proposed by a diverse, bipartisan group of citizens from across the state who participated in the O'Connor House Project, a year-long effort led by Justice O'Connor, to consider public policy solutions to the problems facing our state.

The motto of the O'Connor House is "Where civil talk leads to civic action" and it has come to fruition in this proposal. Justice O'Connor started the O'Connor House Project with Arizona's approaching centennial celebration in mind. "As citizens," she said, "If we make changes to help our state government become more effective and representative, we will celebrate Arizona's second century with more confidence."

We are grateful to Justice O'Connor for her leadership in our state, and hope you will join us in voting yes on proposition 111.

Lucia Howard, President, The O'Connor House, Paradise Valley

Don Budinger, Board Member, The O'Connor House, Paradise Valley

Paid for by Government for Arizona's 2nd Century

Vote Yes on Proposition 111 and Elect a Lt. Governor for Arizona

With an eye on Arizona's approaching centennial, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and the O'Connor House Project brought citizens together this past year to discuss problems facing our state and find solutions to improve our government. Their recommendations represent the views of a diverse, bi-partisan group of people from across the state. Electing a Lt. Governor for Arizona was among the most popular of their reform ideas.

Governor Jan Brewer once said she should be the poster child for a campaign to create a Lt. Governor, having been the 5th Arizona Governor to ascend from Secretary of State. 45 states in America have a Lt. Governor, and "truth in advertising" is the primary objective of this constitutional change. Arizona voters should have a clear understanding of our state executive's line of succession.

As Chairman of Government for Arizona 2nd Century, a group of business and political leaders who are working to support Justice O'Connor's project, we urge you to vote yes on Proposition 111 and let Arizona voters elect a Lt. Governor.

Michael Bidwill, Chairman, Government for Arizona's 2nd Century, Phoenix

Susan Gerard, Board Member, Government for Arizona's 2nd Century, Phoenix

Paid for by Government for Arizona's 2nd Century

Arizona Needs a Lieutenant Governor. Vote YES on Proposition 111

Please join me in voting yes on Prop 111 to create the position of lieutenant governor for the state of Arizona. Prop 111 will not only increase the efficacy of Arizona's governance structure but will also increase transparency to the voters of Arizona. Our current system designates the Secretary of State as first in line of succession should the acting Governor vacate office. However, this system does not stipulate the Secretary of State be of the same party or share the same policy positions of the vacating - and elected - Governor. This simply does make for fair or efficient government for the citizens of Arizona. We deserve leaders elected by the voters and representing the will of the voters. There is a reason that 43 states have lieutenant governors - it is a system that works and is transparent. This bipartisan referendum is about making government better without making it bigger. Starting in 2014, each party will have a gubernatorial and lieutenant gubernatorial candidate elected on a ticket, with the lieutenant governor assuming the duties of the Secretary of State as well as being first in line of succession. "Truth in advertising" is the primary objective of this change. Arizona voters deserve transparency when electing our state's leaders.

Robert L. Burns, State Senate President, Peoria

Paid for by Government for Arizona's 2nd Century

VOTE YES ON PROP. 111

Since the beginning of our great State's history, we have seen multiple governors leave office and be replaced by the Secretary of State. In fact, since 1987, no Arizona governor has completed two full terms.

In light of this history, I wholeheartedly support Proposition 111. This proposition will change the name of the office from secretary of state to lieutenant governor. This is a truth in voting issue and from my perspective voters will be more cognizant of who they are voting for when choosing a "lieutenant governor."

Arizona is one of five remaining states in the U.S. where a position other than a lieutenant governor is named the successor to the governor. It's time to make Arizona's election process more transparent for one of the most important elected offices in the State.

VOTE YES ON PROP. 111

Tom Simplot, Phoenix

Paid for by Government for Arizona's 2nd Century

Time for Lieutenant Governor is Now

Arizona has not had a governor leave office under normal circumstances since 1975. Since then, governors have left the office due to death, impeachment and resignation, thus thrusting the state's chief elections officer - the secretary of state - into the office of governor.

Arizona is one of only five states that do not have the office of lieutenant governor. The time to create that office is now. Proposition 111 changes the title of secretary of state to that of lieutenant governor.

Voters in a primary election will vote separately for the gubernatorial candidate and lieutenant governor candidate of their choosing. In the general election, however, the chosen nominees for governor and lieutenant governor of the same party will run and be elected as a ticket, similar to how we vote for president and vice president.

It's a simple change to the state constitution that, as recent history has shown, is needed in Arizona. The chain of succession in state government will be crystal clear in voters' minds and will smooth the transition to the top office should a sitting governor vacate the office for whatever reason.

We urge you to vote for this commonsense reform to Arizona state government.

Glenn Hamer, President & CEO, The Arizona Chamber of Commerce & Industry, Phoenix

Reginald M. Ballantyne III, Chairman, The Arizona Chamber of Commerce & Industry, Phoenix

Paid for by Arizona Chamber of Commerce & Industry

Dear Voter,

Currently, the Arizona State Constitution designates the Secretary of State as the successor of the Governor in the event of the Governor's death, resignation, removal from office or permanent disability. In most other states across the nation, the first person in the line of succession is known as the lieutenant governor.

Proposition 111 changes the title of Arizona's Secretary of State to Lieutenant Governor and requires the candidates for Governor and Lieutenant Governor to run as a team on the same ticket in the General Election.

The Lieutenant Governor would continue to perform the duties of Secretary of State.

I have been a longtime advocate for a lieutenant governor. In fact, this is a change that I championed in 1994.

Several times in the past twenty years, Arizona's Secretary of State has risen to the office of Governor. In two of the three most recent occurrences, the Secretary of State was of a different party than the predecessor. A Lieutenant Governor would provide for a smooth and stable transition for executive leadership.

Please join me in voting Yes on Proposition 111.

Sincerely,

Jan Brewer, Governor, Phoenix


ARGUMENTS "AGAINST" PROPOSITION 111

The referendum to change the title of Secretary of State to Lieutenant Governor is a ballot issue that seems innocuous enough, but carries unintended consequences and is more than a name change, since it alters the manner in which we choose the Governor. The name change alone is undesirable as it will allow the Lieutenant Governor to place himself/herself in the position of a Governor in waiting, much as the U.S. Vice President, tending largely to public relations and ceremonial duties. Although the many duties of Secretary of State will remain, for now, it won't be long before the position will be declared too high profile and important to be burdened with petty administrative duties, such as issuing notary certificates and registering trade names. Duties will be quickly spun off to other Departments.

But the real mischief in the referendum is changing the method of selection of the Governor with hardly any public debate or any showing that such a change is even necessary. The proposal places the primary election winning candidate of each party for Governor and Lieutenant Governor together as one ticket, with the Governor carrying the other into office. The independence now enjoyed as Secretary of State will be lost. The proposal also eliminates run off elections and apparently awards the Governorship to the candidate with the most votes, but not requiring a majority.

The State does not need another potentate to parade before the press and public. The election of Governor is too important to change without additional public debate. The name change is an unnecessary vanity promotion, the joint ticket election method is problematic, and a less than majority vote Governor is likely to be elected all too frequently. Vote NO on Proposition 111.

Thomas E. Haney, Phoenix


The Arizona Farm Bureau thinks it is inappropriate and unworkable to expect partisan candidates for governor and lieutenant governor to run separately before the primary and then to act as a "team" after the primary. Further, how would this work for a non-partisan candidate for governor with no one filing for lieutenant governor? This proposition needs more work.

Kevin G. Rogers, President, Arizona Farm Bureau Federation, Gilbert

James W. Klinker, Chief Administrative Officer, Arizona Farm Bureau Federation, Gilbert

Paid for by Arizona Farm Bureau Federation

PROPOSITION 111 ~ BALLOT FORMAT

BALLOT FORMAT
 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION BY THE LEGISLATURE RELATING TO THE EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT [SCR 1013]

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA; AMENDING ARTICLE V, SECTION 1, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA, AS AMENDED BY A 1992 INITIATIVE MEASURE DESIGNATED AS BALLOT PROPOSITION 107; REPEALING ARTICLE V, SECTION 1, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA, AS AMENDED BY 1991 HOUSE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION 2001 DESIGNATED AS BALLOT PROPOSITION 100; AMENDING ARTICLE V, SECTIONS 6 AND 9, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA; AMENDING ARTICLE V, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA, BY ADDING SECTION 13; RELATING TO THE EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT.

DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CHANGES THE NAME OF THE OFFICE OF SECRETARY OF STATE TO THE OFFICE OF LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR; PROVIDES THAT THE NOMINEES OF EACH PARTY FOR GOVERNOR AND LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, SELECTED SEPARATELY BY VOTERS AT THE PRIMARY ELECTION, SHALL RUN ON ONE TICKET AND BE VOTED ON TOGETHER IN THE GENERAL ELECTION.

 

 

A "yes" vote shall have the effect of changing the name of the office of Secretary of State to the office of Lieutenant Governor. It will also require that each political party's nominees for Governor and Lieutenant Governor run on one ticket and be voted on together in the general election.

YES

A "no" vote shall have the effect of retaining the current office of Secretary of State as a position elected separately from the office of Governor.

NO

 

 

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The Ballot Format displayed in HTML reflects only the text of the Ballot Proposition and does not reflect how it will appear on the General Election Ballot.
Spelling, grammar, and punctuation were reproduced as submitted in the "for" and "against" arguments.


KEN BENNETT
Arizona Secretary of State

© August 2010