Arizona Secretary of State - Ken Bennett


 
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TITLE 3. AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER 12. ARIZONA EXPOSITION AND STATE FAIR BOARD


Supp. 02-4

Former Title 3, Chapter 12, Article 2, Section R4-12-201, renumbered to Title 3, Chapter 9, Article 3, Section R4-9-301; new Title 3, Chapter 12, Article 1, Section R3-4-101 renumbered from Title 3, Chapter 4, Article 1, Section R3-4-101; new Title 3, Chapter 12, Article 2, Sections R3-12-201 through R3-12-212, renumbered from Title 3, Chapter 4, Article 2, Sections R3-4-201 through R3-4-212 (Supp. 91-4).

(Authority: A.R.S. § 3-1003)

ARTICLE 1. DEFINITIONS

Section

R3-12-101. Definitions

ARTICLE 2. GAME DESCRIPTIONS AND STANDARDS

Article 2, consisting of Sections R3-12-201 through R3-12-212, repealed; new Article 2, consisting of Sections R3-12-201 through R3-12-206, made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

Section

R3-12-201. Hoop or Ring Toss Games

R3-12-202. Dart Games

R3-12-203. Ball Toss Games

R3-12-204. Shooting Games

R3-12-205. Coin Games

R3-12-206. Other Games

R3-12-207. Repealed

R3-12-208. Repealed

R3-12-209. Repealed

R3-12-210. Repealed

R3-12-211. Repealed

R3-12-212. Repealed

ARTICLE 3. CONCESSIONAIRES

Section

R3-12-301. Safety

R3-12-302. Posting Prizes and Game Standards

R3-12-303. Prizes

R3-12-304. Valuable Prize Limit

R3-12-305. Lease Standards

R3-12-306. Uniforms

R3-12-307. Concession Location

R3-12-308. Sound Control

R3-12-309. Height and Line Designation

 

ARTICLE 1. DEFINITIONS

R3-12-101. Definitions

In this Chapter, the following definitions apply unless the context requires otherwise:

"Arizona State Fair Games Inspector" or "Inspector" means any person employed by the Director to enforce this Chapter. The term includes the Midway Coordinator, the person employed by the Director to coordinate midway rides, concessions, and games and assist in placing equipment assigned to the midway.

"Board" means the Arizona Exposition and State Fair Board.

"Concession" means any business that sells merchandise or services, conducts games, or provides other entertainment regulated by the Board.

"Concessionaire" means any person who owns, operates, or leases a concession and includes any person acting as an agent of the concessionaire.

"Director" means the Executive Director of the Board or a Deputy Director if the Executive Director is unable to act.

"Game" means any concession that accepts payment for providing an activity of amusement.

"Location" means the stall, stand, booth, or site from which the concessionaire operates or sells merchandise or services, conducts games, or provides other entertainment.

"Person" has the meaning prescribed in A.R.S. § 1-215.

"Player" means any person who plays a game at the Fair, whether or not the person is attempting to win a prize.

"Prize" means an item won by a player after successful completion of a game's activity.

"State Fair" or "Fair" means the Arizona State Fair, an annual exposition conducted by the Board.

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Renumbered from R3-4-101 (Supp. 91-4). Amended by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

ARTICLE 2. GAME DESCRIPTIONS AND STANDARDS

Article 2, consisting of Sections R3-12-201 through R3-12-212, repealed; new Article 2, consisting of Sections R3-12-201 through R3-12-206, made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-201. Hoop or Ring Toss Games

A. In General. A player tosses each hoop or ring over a target. The object of the game is for the hoop or ring to land on the target, with a portion of the target passing through the hoop or ring.

B. Specific Standards. A concessionaire shall:

1. Advise the player regarding the extent of the target that must pass through the hoop or ring; and

2. Ensure that hoops or rings of the same color at a location are the same size or advise the player of different sizes by posting signs or using color codes to denote different sizes.

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Amended effective Sept. 9, 1988 (Supp. 88-3). Amended effective September 25, 1991 (Supp. 91-3). Renumbered from R3-4-201 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed; new Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-202. Dart Games

A. General Standards. A concessionaire shall:

1. Ensure that the target area for metal-tip dart games is made of material that will accept and retain a metal tip dart;

2. Use darts with metal, velcro, or suction cup tips;

3. Ensure that darts are thrown by hand or propelled by a mechanical device;

4. Place the target at the back of the location, at least 3 feet but not more than 15 feet from the foul line;

5. Ensure that the target is stationary at all times; and

6. Construct the location in a manner that prevents darts from reaching adjoining locations or aisles.

B. Game Descriptions and Specific Standards

1. Balloon or Balloon Smash. The targets are inflated balloons. A player throws one or more darts to burst a predetermined number of balloons. If the player bursts the predetermined number of balloons with the darts, the player wins the designated prize.

2. Dart Throw. The targets are shapes of various sizes located on the target area. A player throws or propels darts individually at a target. If the player hits a predetermined target and the dart remains in or on that target, the player wins the designated prize.

3. Tic-Tac-Toe Dart. The target is a tic-tac-toe board located on the target area. If a player sticks a dart in each of 3 adjacent spaces on the tic-tac-toe board, either vertically, horizontally, or diagonally, the player wins the designated prize.

4. Add `Em Up Darts. The target consists of numbered squares located on the target area. A concessionaire awards prizes based on the total score, calculated by adding the numbers on each square holding a dart. If a dart is stuck on a line, a player may throw the dart again.

Historical Note

Adopted effective September 25, 1991 (Supp. 91-3). Renumbered from R3-4-202 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed; new Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-203. Ball Toss Games

A. General Standards. A concessionaire shall ensure that:

1. Each ball used at a location is the same weight and size; and

2. Targets are either of identical weight and size or color-coded to show target differences, or any target difference is described on a sign.

B. Game Descriptions and Specific Standards

1. Milk Bottle. A player tosses or throws a specified number of balls at simulated milk bottles. The player wins by either tipping over or knocking bottles off a raised platform as designated by the concessionaire. A Concessionaire may vary the number of bottles and balls used in each game. A concessionaire shall ensure that:

a. The bottles are constructed of wood, metal, plastic, or a combination of these materials;

b. There are no floating or loose weights in bottles; and

c. The weight of each bottle does not exceed 7.5 pounds.

2. Milk Can. If a player tosses a ball into the opening of a milk can, cone, or similar object, the player wins the designated prize.

3. Football and Tire. If a player tosses or throws a football through a stationary tire or hoop, the player wins the designated prize.

4. Basketball and Hoop. If a player tosses or throws a basketball through a basketball or similar hoop, the player wins the designated prize.

5. Bushel Basket. If a player tosses each ball into a bushel basket or similar object mounted on a stationary backdrop at a fixed angle, and the ball stays in the basket, the player wins the designated prize. If a ball hits the rim and stays in the basket, the player wins the designated prize.

6. Cat, Circle, Star, or Diamond. If a player tosses each ball into a simulated cat's mouth or a round, diamond-shaped, or star-shaped hole, the player wins the designated prize.

7. Ping-Pong Ball and Floating Target. A player tosses each ping-pong ball into a dish, saucer, cup, or ashtray floating in water. If a predetermined number of balls remain in the dishes, saucers, cups, or ashtrays, the player wins the designated prize. A concessionaire shall ensure that dishes, saucers, cups, or ashtrays are:

a. Not stacked on top of each other; and

b. In the water and floating at water level.

8. Break the Plate, Record, or Bottle. A player tosses or throws a specified number of balls at a plate, phonograph record, or bottle. The player wins a designated prize based upon the number of targets broken.

9. Punk Rack. The targets for this game are rows of dolls or cats on a ledge at the back of the location. If the player knocks the correct number of dolls or cats over or off of the ledge, the player wins the designated prize. A concessionaire shall ensure that:

a. The dolls or cats are filled with sawdust, polystyrene, cotton, or a similar material;

b. The hair protruding from the side of the dolls or cats does not exceed three inches.

10. Rolldown. The player rolls a specified number of balls down an alley. The object of the game is to place the balls in numbered slots at the end of the alley. The concessionaire calculates the total score by adding the numbers of the slots that contain a ball at the end of the game. If a player achieves a score above or below a predetermined number, the player wins the designated prize. A concessionaire shall ensure that the alley surface is smooth.

a. 3-Pin. The player rolls a specified number of balls down an alley. The object of the game is to knock over all three pins sitting on designated spots in a triangle. A concessionaire shall:

i. Set the triangle with the two front pins on a line that is perpendicular to a line coming from the player;

ii. Set the front pins so the ball may knock down both pins if the player's roll is between the pins;

iii. Mark the alley with a grid and spots for the pins;

iv. Ensure that the designated spots are no larger than the base of the pins; and

v. Ensure that the alley is a smooth, level surface no more than six feet long.

b. Sidewinder. The object of the game is for the player to control a ball rolling down a downward-slanted, multi-curved alley by tilting the alley to one side or the other with a steering wheel. The player wins by putting the ball through a hole at the end of the alley without the ball falling off the alley. Side rails may be used on part of the alley to help the player control the ball. A concessionaire shall ensure that the alley is a smooth, flat surface with a downward angle of no more than 15 degrees.

11. Skee Ball. A player rolls a specified number of balls up a mechanical alley into numbered targets. A mechanical scorer or computer calculates the score to determine whether the player wins the designated prize. A concessionaire shall ensure that the alley surface is smooth.

12. Bank Ball. The object of the game is for a player to bank a ball off the front surface of a sandwich board into a basket located in front of the board's legs. The player shall use only the front surface of the board. A concessionaire shall:

a. Ensure that the board is a sandwich board that, together with its legs, is not more than six feet high;

b. Ensure that there are two chains attached to the legs to secure the board when it is opened to the standing position;

c. Secure the basket to the legs of the sandwich board so that the basket is a minimum of nine inches in front of the board's legs; and

d. Ensure that the board surface is smooth.

13. Kiddie Toss. A player throws a velcro-covered ball at a velcro target. If the player hits the target, the player wins the designated prize. If a ball does not stick to a target, the player may throw again with a different ball.

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Renumbered from R3-4-203 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed; new Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-204. Shooting Games

A. In General. A player uses a weapon to shoot a target at the rear of the location. The target may be stationary or mobile.

B. Game Descriptions and Specific Standards

1. Shoot-Out-The-Star or Machine Gun. A concessionaire provides a player with an automatic air pellet gun and 100 pellets to shoot at a star-shaped target. If the player shoots out the entire target, the player wins the designated prize. The concessionaire shall ensure that the star is not more than 1 and 1/4 inch from point to point.

2. Water Racer. The game involves group competition. A player wins a prize based on the number of players competing. Each player, using a water pistol, shoots water into a target. Water striking the target causes a balloon to inflate or advances an object to ring a bell. The player who bursts the balloon or rings the bell first is the winner.

3. Rapid Fire. The game involves group competition. Each player uses an electronic pistol to shoot at a target. Hits on the target increase the player's score. The first player to reach a predetermined score is the winner.

4. Cork Gallery. A player uses a cork gun to shoot at targets located on a shelf. If the player knocks a target over or off the shelf, the player wins a prize. The prize is based on the target knocked over or off the shelf or on the number of targets knocked over or off the shelf. A concessionaire shall ensure that the base of each target has a uniform shape, front and rear.

5. Gun Ball. A player shoots balls at stationary targets in the location. The player wins by knocking down all the targets. A concessionaire shall ensure that:

a. The balls are of identical size and weight; and

b. The targets are of identical size and weight.

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Renumbered from R3-4-204 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed; new Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-205. Coin Games

A. In General. A player uses a token or coin of U.S. denomination. The player pitches or tosses the coin so that it lands and remains on or in a target within the location. The target may be stationary or mobile.

B. Game Descriptions and Specific Standards

1. Spot Pitch or Lucky Strike. A player pitches a coin at colored spots located on a table in the center of the location. If the player pitches the coin so that it either touches or stays inside of a spot, the player wins the designated prize.

2. Plate Pitch. A player pitches a coin onto a glass plate. If the coin remains on the plate, the player wins the designated prize.

3. Glass Pitch. A player pitches a coin into or onto bowls, ashtrays, dishes, or glasses. If the coin remains in one of the top "target" glass items, the player wins that item.

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Renumbered from R3-4-205 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed; new Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-206. Other Games

A. Tip-Em-Up Bottle. A concessionaire provides a player with a pole that has a string attached to it at one end. A hoop or ring is attached to the other end of the string. If the player, using this "fishing" pole with a hoop or ring, raises a bottle lying on its side to an upright position, the player wins the designated prize.

B. Hi-Striker. A player, using a wooden or metal maul, strikes a lever that causes a metal weight to rise on a guide line or track and ring a bell. If the player rings the bell a predetermined number of times, the player wins the designated prize.

C. Rope Ladder. A player climbs a rope ladder that is anchored at both ends, but swivels. If the player rings the bell or buzzer at the top of the ladder, the player wins the designated prize.

D. Whac-A-Mole. A player hits as many animated moles as possible with a rubber mallet in a five hole target area. The animated moles pop up and down at random in the holes. The first player to hit a predetermined number of moles wins the designated prize.

E. Speed Bump Bowling. A player rolls a bowling ball or similar ball over a hump in a track. If the player rolls the ball to the other side of the hump and the ball remains there, the player wins the designated prize.

F. Speedball Radar. A player throws a specified number of balls past a radar device to establish the speed at which the balls are thrown. This enables the player to estimate the speed of the ball. If the player accurately estimates the speed of the last ball thrown, the player wins the designated prize. A concessionaire shall ensure that the radar device is mounted in a stationary position.

G. Horse Race Derby. A player advances a horse by shooting or rolling a ball into a target area. The faster and more skillfully the player shoots or rolls the ball into the target area, the faster the player's horse will run. If the player's horse is the first to cross the finish line, the player wins the designated prize.

H. Shuffleboard. A player pushes a specified number of pucks down a shuffleboard alley to knock over pins at the end of the alley. If the player knocks down all of the pins, the player wins the designated prize.

I. Beanbag. A player tosses or throws a specified number of beanbags or simulated beanbag at cans, bottles, or other objects on a raised platform. If the player knocks one or more objects off of the raised platform or tips one or more targets over, the player wins the designated prize.

J. Soccer Kick. If a player kicks a soccer ball through a hole in the target area, the player wins the designated prize.

K. Pool Table. A player using a pool cue and solid white cue ball is given a fixed number of chances to shoot a fixed number of multicolored balls into targets or pockets on a pool table. The number of chances and multicolored balls used is based on the type of prize offered. The first shot is to break or separate the multicolored balls from their racked position on the table. During the first shot, any multicolored balls that strike targets or fall into pockets count toward the player's total score. After the first shot, the player shall specify the colored ball or balls and the target or pocket for the ball or balls. If, after the first shot, the specified ball or balls do not strike the target or fall into the pocket specified, the player loses the game. If the solid white cue ball strikes a target or falls into a pocket on any shot, the player loses the game. If the player shoots all balls on the table into the specified targets or pockets using the allotted number of successive shots, the player wins the designated prize. A concessionaire shall ensure that the pool table surface is smooth, level, and in good repair.

L. Put Out The Light. A player drops five metal plates measuring four inches in diameter onto a target surface measuring six and 3/8 inches in diameter in an effort to completely cover the target surface. The player drops the plates from a designated height, marked by an electric beam that triggers a buzzer. The buzzer sounds to alert the player and concessionaire of any height violation. If the buzzer sounds and the player drops a plate, the player loses the game. Once dropped, plates are not moved until the concessionaire makes a final determination of a winner. If the player completely covers the surface with the plates, the player wins the designated prize. The concessionaire may change surface and disk size in proportion to the measurements listed above. These changes are subject to the approval of the Arizona State Fair Games Inspector who shall rule on the requested changes immediately.

M. Fisharama. A concessionaire provides a player with a pole that has a string attached to it at one end. A magnet is attached to the other end of the string. The player uses the magnet to catch a predetermined target that is visually distinguishable from other targets floating in a water-filled elliptic trough. If the player catches the predetermined target, the player wins the designated prize. The concessionaire shall ensure that the magnets can stick to and pick up each of the potential targets.

N. Flipgame. A player propels an object into a target by using a mechanical launching device. The player positions the object on the launching device and then propels the object by striking the device with a rubber mallet. If the player flips the object into the target, the player wins the designated prize. The target may be stationary or mobile.

O. Wacky Wire. A player passes a metal wire with a minimum one-inch circular opening in the middle of the wire down a curved wire moving clockwise during play. The player wins by passing the wire down to the base of the moving curved wire without touching the moving curved wire. A buzzer signifies any touch by a player.

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Renumbered from R3-4-206 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed; new Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-207. Repealed

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Renumbered from R3-4-207 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-208. Repealed

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Renumbered from R3-4-208 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-209. Repealed

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Renumbered from R3-4-209 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-210. Repealed

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Renumbered from R3-4-210 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-211. Repealed

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Renumbered from R3-4-211 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-212. Repealed

Historical Note

Adopted effective October 22, 1987 (Supp. 87-4). Renumbered from R3-4-212 (Supp. 91-4). Section repealed by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

ARTICLE 3. CONCESSIONAIRES

R3-12-301. Safety

A. A concessionaire shall:

1. Operate a concession in a safe manner; and

2. Use equipment that is in good, safe operating condition.

B. A concessionaire shall use material in the construction of the concession that is in good, safe condition for the concession's intended use.

C. If an Arizona State Fair Games Inspector believes there is a hazard in concession operation, equipment, or construction, or any component of the equipment or construction materials, the Inspector shall close the concession until satisfied that the concessionaire has corrected the hazardous condition.

Historical Note

New Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-302. Posting Prizes and Game Standards

A. For every game a concessionaire shall conspicuously post, during all times of operation, a sign stating:

1. The price of the game;

2. Clear game instructions and standards; and

3. The exact task the player is required to complete to win the designated prize.

B. A concessionaire shall use a sign made of wood, metal, masonite, or a similar sturdy material, with block lettering of a contrasting color, at least two inches high.

C. The concessionaire shall not charge more than one price to play a game, except that the concessionaire may charge a separate price for children. If the concessionaire charges a separate price for children, the concessionaire shall post a sign that states the maximum age for the children's price.

Historical Note

New Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-303. Prizes

A. A concessionaire shall display all prizes while the game is open to the public.

B. A concessionaire shall not:

1. Award prizes that are not displayed;

2. Award cash prizes;

3. Buy back for cash or any combination of prizes, articles, tickets, numbers, or other medium of exchange, any prize won by a player at the Fair; or

4. Offer the following merchandise prizes:

a. Weapons of any kind, such as firearms, knives, whips, martial art items, bike chains, studded jewelry and accessories, water pistols or guns, or pea or bean shooters;

b. Fireworks of any kind;

c. Handcuffs or fingercuffs;

d. Melted glass bottles;

e. Items that are inconsistent with the state's interest in providing entertainment for families and children;

f. Eyeglasses, other than sunglasses;

g. Medicine or drugs of any kind; or

h. Fowl or animals, except goldfish.

C. An Arizona State Fair Games Inspector may prohibit other prizes, based on prize or merchandise:

1. Safety;

2. Legality; or

3. Value.

Historical Note

New Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-304. Valuable Prize Limit

A. A concessionaire with a valuable prize may request authorization from the Board to limit the number of valuable prizes any player may win to one prize from each game location during each day of the Fair. The concessionaire shall make the request before the Fair opens. The Board shall authorize the valuable prize limit if:

1. The wholesale value of the prize is $25.00 or more; and

2. The prize is won by successfully completing the game's activity once.

B. If authorized, the concessionaire shall post a sign at the game location that indicates the valuable prize limit.

Historical Note

New Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-305. Lease Standards

A. A person shall not operate a concession at the Fair without first leasing a location for the concession from the Board.

B. An applicant shall provide a document, incorporated by a reference in the lease, that lists the dollar value and total number of each type of prize merchandise that will be offered at the Fair.

C. An applicant shall provide a document, incorporated by a reference in the lease, that lists all prices that will be charged for merchandise, services, games, or other entertainment provided to patrons of the Fair.

D. Any person may apply to lease a location at the Fair for a game. An applicant shall send a letter to the Board that contains the name of the game, a description of the game, location requirements, the exact location for all game components, the applicant's name and address, and a current photograph of the stand. A lease is nontransferable. The lease for each game applies only to the concessionaire who enters into the lease.

E. The Board shall determine the rent to be paid under each game concession lease and ensure that this dollar amount is specified in the lease. For front stand games, the rent is computed by multiplying the footage requirements for the front of the game space by a dollar amount determined by the Board and adding any insurance and utility costs. For center stand games, the rent is computed by multiplying the footage requirements for the front and one side of the game space by a dollar amount determined by the Board and adding any insurance and utility costs. The Board shall not use less than a 10-foot minimum footage requirement in its rent calculations.

F. A separate lease is required for each game concession at the Fair unless:

1. All games are in the same location;

2. The games are not separated by a wall or partition;

3. The games are identical;

4. The prizes for each game are identical; and

5. The price for each game is identical;

G. Upon consideration of the factors in subsections (F)(1) through (F)(5), the Board may include up to 10 games under one lease.

H. A concessionaire shall operate during the hours specified in the lease.

I. The Board and the concessionaire may mutually agree to modify the terms of a lease and shall memorialize any modification in an amended lease.

J. The Board shall not lease a location to an applicant if the applicant makes a material misrepresentation on the application or in documents submitted with the application. If a concessionaire has made a material misrepresentation to the Board, the Board shall cancel the concessionaire's lease, using the applicable provision in the lease, and remove the concession from the Fair.

Historical Note

New Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-306. Uniforms

A concessionaire shall supply uniforms for agents. A concessionaire shall ensure that agents keep the uniforms in a clean and serviceable condition and wear the uniforms during the hours of the Fair.

Historical Note

New Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-307. Concession Location

A concessionaire shall not sell merchandise or services, conduct games, or provide other entertainment more than four feet from the concession location.

Historical Note

New Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-308. Sound Control

A concessionaire operating any loudspeaker at the Fair shall control the volume so that the loudspeaker does not interfere with other concessions or adversely affect Fair patrons. For the game concession area, the maximum decibel level for a loudspeaker is 90.

Historical Note

New Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).

R3-12-309. Height and Line Designation

A concessionaire shall designate a line behind which players stand to play a game. If the game is trailer mounted, an Inspector shall designate the height of the base on which the game is set, based upon safety considerations of R3-12-301 and fairness to the player.

Historical Note

New Section made by final rulemaking at 8 A.A.R. 4838, effective December 27, 2002 (Supp. 02-4).


Scott Cancelosi
Director
Public Services Division

A.A.C. Table of Contents

Commercial Use Fees of this Chapter


Editor
Arizona Administrative Code